A Dream to Help Me Cope With Anything

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By SB_FASD

We went out the other night to a relaxed screening of “Mamma Mia 2: Here We Go Again”. It was in a little arts centre in our town. The evening was co-sponsored by Guideposts, a regional organisation that works toward “a society where all people are valued and have equality of opportunity.”

Our 14-year old met a friend there from our local “FASD Club” (this is what the kids call their get-togethers while we parents drink coffee and chat in the local support group that we started after our son’s diagnosis). She also goes to his specialist school. My husband and I enjoyed the chance to spend a bit of time talking with her mum and some good friends who help run the arts centre.

We were welcomed as we entered by another friend of the family, a young autistic adult who was the most relaxed we have ever seen him. He introduced us to one of his friends, an older adult with additional needs.

As the sing-a-long show progressed, some of the young people got up and danced. Our son and his friend chowed their way through a cup full of sweets, popcorn and chicken and chips from a local shop. They were laughing and giggling, paying half-attention to the movie and the other half to each other. It was sweet.

I loved one of the songs:

“I have a dream, a song to sing
To help me cope with anything
If you see the wonder of a fairy tale
You can take the future even if you fail…”

“I have a dream, a fantasy
To help me through reality
And my destination makes it worth the while
Pushing through the darkness still another mile”

At 8:00 our son kind of suddenly showed me his phone and said he was tired, that he wanted to go home. To be fair, he had been in bed before we went out at 6:30 (he often goes to bed early, I think because he uses up so much mental energy in a day). Part of the negotiation in agreeing to go out was that if he told us he needed to go home, we would.

We did.

Even though the movie was just hitting the best parts, even though my husband and I both were enjoying the social aspect of being out among friends, we left. We congratulated our son on telling us he was ready to leave. We didn’t feel guilty, we were for once in an environment where others understood that we needed to head out. No questions asked. As soon as we got home, our son got into bed, turned off the lights, blasted his music and entered into his pre-sleep zone. Happy.

Once upon a time I was scared for our suggestible son to be around others with communication difficulties. When he was little, the one person he had most problems with was a child who was nearly non-verbal at an after-school club. He simply could not understand why she could not speak in a way he understood. It escalated him. She used only strong language and he mimicked it. He was used to others over-compensating for his own lack of communication skills. He couldn’t interact with her in any kind of positive way. We thought this would be what would happen if he went to a specialist school. He has always been very verbal, even if his understanding often lags behind the words.

But in reality, what happened after we moved him to a specialist school was that his whole being relaxed. This also coincided with – at the suggestion of the school and other professionals involved – giving him more freedom to dress as he likes and to let his hair grow long, acknowledging his gender non-conformity. Our son who was anxious and misunderstood for most of his life eventually, after an adjustment period, lost all those pressures to conform that had been guiding his every day. And those challenging behaviours that grew out of self-preservation started to melt away as his self-confidence grew.

Last Friday night was a vividly wonderful example of the positive ways our creating space for and opening up to the world about our son’s uniqueness has brought him and us joy and support.

There, in that room, was a beautiful future, a vision of life surrounded by friends and supportive people. The laughter and smiles on our son’s face as he was interacting with his friend filled my soul with hope. Seeing that he had role models of adults like him in that room, knowing that there were support people nearby and hopefully would be when in some very distant day that I am no longer here for him, that was exactly what I needed to see. Knowing that some of the adults in the room – community leaders – understand FASD because we have over the years given them the information that they need was also gratifying. The night was good for me too.

Many parents of children with FASD feel fear for the future. I realised at some point a while ago that my fear of his vulnerability was driving too much of his life. I had to stand down. My hypervigilance wasn’t helping. It’s a work in progress, but as he has accessed more support and as we as a family have learned more about appropriate strategies things have become easier. Much easier, if not ‘easy.’

Someone said it simply, “He is growing up.”

His is not the same trajectory other kids might typically take. But once we let go of the way society defines our son’s stages and ages, we were able to see just how little that matters.

He is relatively happy.

He is growing.

He is becoming better able to express his needs and to advocate for himself with words not actions.

He is learning to control his impulses.

He is feeling more secure, less anxious.

He has friends at school who are like him so he isn’t in a constant state of confusion, trying to understand social situations that were way above his head.

He has other friends locally who know about his FASD, whose parents know about his FASD and who also know about and celebrate his considerable strengths.

He has compassion. He is strong. He knows love.

As a mum, I wish my fear had not kept me focused for so many years on trying to help him ‘fit in’ rather than putting my energies sooner into finding him places where he could ‘be’.

If you could have seen that singing, dancing room full of happy young people and adults you too would have felt a sense of great hope.

For all those families in the midst of hard times, please don’t give up on the hope.

 

Four Letter Words for Help – FASD

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By @MB_FASD

Adoption UK carried out a massive media blitz this week based on a survey that said 25% of adoptions risk breakdown because of a crisis fuelled by the trauma children suffered in early life. Trauma which leads to aggression and violence in the adoptive family. It is a picture that a lot of families with children with FASD recognise, although Adoption UK never mentioned FASD in their media work. While not all children with these issues have FASD, it certainly struck a chord with me.

F**k. B***h. S**. Again. And again. At 7.30 in the morning. Or 7.30 in the evening.

Most kids with FASD lack impulse control. That includes over language. Bad language.(There is some research that says language is stored in a different part of the brain to other language, so this may be related to brain wiring too.)

We have a lot of bad language in our house. A lot. And, following the advice of professionals, we ignore it. Most of the time. We have to. If we didn’t we’d be in constant opposition to our son, in constant conflict that would help none of us.

He doesn’t mean it. A very clever educational psychologist once asked us “Why do you assume intentionality?” when discussing some of our son’s seeming acts of defiance. That struck home. We had been assuming that our son was being deliberately naughty. Oppositional defiance disorder is a thing. Some kids with FASD have it. Our son doesn’t. He just can’t control his impulses while dysregulated or partially dysregulated. So a stream of insults fly.

In the mornings and in the evenings, around the edges of his medication, he is partly dysregulated. And at those times the language comes out.

It’s very difficult. We struggle with this in a big way. I do especially. Not because of the words, but it gets really hard as it’s tied up in his refusal to let me help him much of the time. It feels like a strong rejection. (My wife tells me I am not seeing just how often these same words are used in her direction.)

But when addressing me, he always wants Mum. At least, when Mum’s there that’s how it is. He calls for something. I go to his room, and get a string of expletives and what feels to me like rejection.

I bring him food, and he won’t even look at it because I breathed on it. Happened just recently, I made mini-cheeseburgers to eat but I breathed on the food. So it’s covered in germs. Sometimes the reaction is physical and can hurt, but the actual blows are the easiest to take, it’s the emotional ones that are harder to shake off.

It’s really hard not to take this as rejection. I know that many times I don’t do a good enough job of showing that I’m relaxed. That I’m not irritated. That the bad language washes over me. Which generally it does. But the constant pushing away his harder to deal with. At a certain level it hurts.

I know he doesn’t mean it because he often does let me do the foot rubs and the leg scratches. When Mum is away, or just out, then all of a sudden my attempts at cookery are suddenly acceptable, and my help with the latest project really needed.

Our son isn’t proud of these moments – he apologises after the fact, he comes back to build bridges.  He stays close.  (He once famously told a deputy headteacher that he had been dysregulated when he cursed at him, he couldn’t help it then but he was sorry – a pointer to the fact that, with self-awareness, change happens).

The ways in which aggression can manifest itself are complex.

In a drive to highlight a very problem, and look for government action to support adoption, Adoption UK risked leaving an extremely negative picture which will undoubtedly put many people off adopting. As an adopted person myself, I would have done it differently. I would have painted the picture as bleak as it needs to be, but then softened it with hope, and a perspective.  In our house we have elements of all of those things that were splashed across the media following the results of the survey.  It’s not that we don’t get it.  But because we know the reason for our son’s behaviour, we frame our approach accordingly.  Importantly, we have a diagnosis in place as we head into the coming teenage years, something the experts say is vital to chances of a successful transition to adulthood.

Once you reinterpret the behaviours as a symptom of the condition, and learn strategies to address the underlying need, the sense of crisis diminishes.  A year ago we were in an intense period of crisis but things can turn around.

If you can’t change the child, then you have to change the environment around the child. You have to reduce reasons for anxiety. You have to adapt their environment so they can live as calmly as possible as much of the time as possible in that environment. You have to give them the time they need to adjust to change, whether that change is getting dressed for school or moving from one activity to another. We’ve changed his room, put in a quiet space and let him have disco lights that calm him. We let him dress how he wants to go out, not how we would like. We adapt because he can’t. And we’re lucky, friends and family have adapted too.

Things have got much better with time as we have learned to do this. He has learned as he gets older to begin to understand his triggers and to ask for help. He has been helped definitely by meds for ADHD.

No child is unchanging, nothing lasts forever. Situations change. And we have to change along with them. I have to do better at soaking up the bad language, and helping guide our son to a calmer place when dysregulated.

What’s the f***ing choice?

*******
P.S. – Support is available for families who are struggling.

Yes! Follow THEIR Dreams, Not Yours

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By SB

Children with disabilities too often hear ‘no’.  This was true for our little one who has a neurodisability as the result of prenatal exposure to alcohol – a Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).  Before we understood that his brain was simply not wired to respond quickly or intuitively to a world he found deeply overwhelming, we kept ‘correcting’ him.  Every day he heard in a thousand different ways that his instincts and his responses were somehow wrong. That was our fault, not his.  We moved too fast for his brain to process it all.  Unknowingly, we threw him in over his head time and time and time again. We were too slow to hear what he was telling us, too slow to react to his needs.  His behaviour may have been the focus, but we were the ones who needed to change. He was finally diagnosed with FASD at the age of 10, but even after the diagnosis it took time for us to adapt to the implications of his brain damage.

Things started to improve when we started to listen to him, really listen.  We realized that while he cannot always phrase it well, he has insights into his condition that can help us to help him.  It became a positive loop – the more we listened, the more we understood.  It took some detective work and some professional input, but the more insight we had, the more his anxiety decreased.  The more relaxed he was, the better he could express himself.  Being more able to understand his perspectives allowed us to agree or at least discuss strategies.  Slowly, with this new shared understanding, we all started to come up for air.

One key element was seeing the world from his perspective – understanding the impact of the negatives we were showering over him with our (we thought) gentle ‘helpful’ reminders.  We dropped the ‘no-s’ and ‘don’ts’, and we started to say yes more often.

Accepting he would always need support, we set out quite deliberately to build a network around him, and began to prioritise settings where he was better understood (including moving to a specialist school).  We also came to appreciate that as hard as it was for us to wrap our heads around the diagnosis, it was harder for extended family, friends, teachers, and people in the wider community.  So, we opened up about our lives, his struggles.  We very carefully and consciously helped educate those around him about FASD.  We tried to face it all with positivity.

Life-changing stuff, that turned out to be in ways big and small (even if it is still a work in progress, as readers of this blog will know).  It included me giving up a career of nearly 30-years to work on raising FASD awareness full-time.

But this wasn’t one-directional.  Our son also has stepped up and has led us to a whole new understanding of what he can do with the right kind of support.

I’ll give you a rather extreme example.

Our son doesn’t see or experience the world the same way we do.  But that doesn’t mean he doesn’t have his own dreams.  All kids do.  Our guy has in his head a definite picture of where he wants to go, what he wants to accomplish.  Specifically, our son wants to play Wembley.  Or the O2.  Preferably with Little Mix.  You probably just smiled.  But please know, he is dead serious about this.

All those years he spent watching Hannah Montana, perfecting the songs and dances.  The hundred times he watched the DVD about how Justin Bieber became a star.  The disappointment when his YouTube channel didn’t get a million views once we set it up, and the belief it still will someday.  Each and every night spent in his room blasting Little Mix, rocking and memorizing and absorbing the music into his very soul.  Engaging his muscle memory, using music to perseverate on something, to focus his mind, to help him relax, to help his body know when and how to keep it all together.  Countless ‘concerts’ in his room with stuffed toy ‘fans’ and toy stage lights aimed just so.  The years of shopping in charity shops for costumes.  Researching stage lights.  Contemplating how curtains rise and fall.  The years of music and singing lessons.  Ongoing involvement in local supportive theatre groups.

Our guy has been preparing mentally for his Tour for a long, long time.  And in his mind, this was and is very, very real.  A dream this big could be heartbreaking. Some might say we should ‘nip it in the bud’ to avoid profound disappointment.  And yet…

There was and is no way on this earth that I am going to tell this child that he will not make it to Wembley.  Because, really, I don’t know that.  He just might.  And he sure isn’t likely to get there if we don’t believe he can.

Over the past several months his conversations about his Tour became increasingly insistent.  He wanted so desperately to perform, but couldn’t quite figure out how to make it happen.  He was becoming frustrated.

So, we thought outside of every box, and decided to give muscle to his dream.  We rallied all those people around him who could help and we simply said yes.

Yes.  We will help you bring your rainbow-coloured Flashing Lights Tour to life.  Yes, people will come to see just you perform.  Yes, seriously!  You can do it.  We told him his grandmother rented a school theatre.  Oh, if you could have seen the light that sparked in his eyes.  He went to work.  He orchestrated it all.  He designed the stage.  He planned, practiced and rehearsed his ten-song set list at school and with his voice teacher.  We designed posters and Tour merchandise.  Thanks to his auntie, he had five costume changes all lined up.  Another auntie agreed to be MC, fully prepared to support him in whatever way he needed that night.  A teacher arranged things in the sound and light booth – not blinking when he said he wanted it to look like the Ariana Grande stage, showing how we could improvise.  About 50 people agreed to attend.

When the night finally arrived, we weren’t sure how things would go.  During the sound check he closed into himself.  He looked frighteningly small and alone on the big stage.  With a thud in my stomach, I started questioning this whole idea.  But in one of the most eye-opening moments of the whole experience, we literally saw him stand taller, more confidently when two of his young friends arrived early and started to cheer him on in practice.  Singing for them, he expanded again.  I knew then that the night would be golden.

It started with the ‘Meet and Greet’ – adoring fans clamouring outside his ‘Tour Bus’ (a superb addition provided by a friend).  His ‘security guard’ then hustled him into the theatre.  Curtains opened and for about 45 minutes our little one filled not just the stage but the whole theatre with his presence.  The audience were armed with tour tags on lanyards, LED lights, glow-sticks, colourful scarves to wave.  Song by song he grew stronger, more confident until the almost impossibly perfect moment during the encore when he became complete amid confetti canons and massive balloons bouncing across the stage and around the adoring and cheering audience.  This was the grand finale he has so often dreamed about!  He floated through the After Show party and during his ride home on the Tour Bus.

For this one night we removed all the roadblocks, and we said one big, huge, concerted “Yes!”  We stepped so far out of the mold it was a bit scary for us all.  It was a risk he was willing to take, so we took it.  We showed him that his dreams can come true, that we hear him, that we will cheer for him in the way he choses to present himself to the world.  Rather than encourage him to fit in to a model that was never created for him, rather than encouraging him to keep his head down so as not to attract attention due to his vulnerability, we said yes.  Maybe it was counter-intuitive … but we did exactly the opposite of what would be ‘safe’ for him as a child with a disability.  We followed his lead and put him up front, under the spotlights, right there on centre stage, precisely where he wanted to be.  Where he deserved to be.

And the unexpected happened.  All the glitz and attention calmed him.  A family member summed it up, “He was totally fulfilled, therefore he was totally at peace with himself. He would have done that performance to ten or 10,000. It was his place, his dream and his achievement.”  (He later said to me, “Mummy, I wouldn’t be nervous, I could sing to 30,000 people.”)  A friend observed, “The people, the songs, the atmosphere – he breathed in (his form of yoga) and found himself calm and in control after the performance.”  It never dawned on me that this was a type of self-regulation.

In creating space for him to give of himself so fully, we all became that much more complete ourselves.  “His zest for life is infectious!” one friend said. “Who else can get a room of adults and awkward teenagers dancing and waving scarves?! We all left with aching mouths from smiling and feeling very proud.”

Another friend quoted Audrey Lourde, “It’s not our differences that divide us, it is our inability to recognise, accept and celebrate those differences.”  For that night, we were united in our son’s world, and boy did we celebrate those differences.  And it was a blast.

The whole evening was full of sparkle and colour.  His effervescent spirit held us all up just that much higher.  We were all there with him, for him, because of him.  This was his 13th birthday celebration – his chosen way to joyfully enter teendom.

I know not every child can get on stage and belt out ten songs in front of a crowd while dancing in glittery costumes.  But every child has some one thing.  Whatever that one thing may be deserves oxygen and sunlight so it can grow.  If we listen closely enough, and help our kids follow their dreams (not ours), we are planting the surety in their souls that they are heard, they do matter, and this world sparkles and shines more brightly because they are here.  Maybe to you my family sounds bonkers.  Yes, we did this Big.  Large.  It was most certainly over the top.  That was a conscious choice.  We chose this, rather than a holiday.  It may be unusual to spend an evening simulating a pop concert instead of going away – but this was oh so much better than scurrying off in a car where he’d meltdown to some place where he would be overwhelmed and lost just because that is what people do for holidays.

The memory of this night will last forever.  Hopefully it will always be with him, deep inside, on those dark nights when self-doubt starts to gnaw away.  Hopefully this experience will serve as some kind of insulation against the relentless onslaught on his self-esteem that we fear the teenage and young adult years will involve.

Come what may, for this one glorious night our little one was up there, giving his all to a room full of people who were quite happy to hear HIS voice.  We weren’t telling him what to do, he was showing us what he can do.  For this night, he was surrounded by the thunderous applause of one huge and resounding “Yes!”  For this night, he shone forth in all his magnificence.  We could see – literally see – the network we created cheering him on.  The thought of that still brings me to tears, even if I was too busy at the time jumping and dancing in the front row to understand then the full impact of the Flashing Lights Tour.

We must have done something right.  The first words out of his mouth the next morning were “Mummy!  I had a dream about going on tour again!”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Super Teen with FASD

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By SB_FASD

I see it sometimes – the future.  A way he might flick his head.  A look.  Some unexpected insight. The way he sometimes asks if I am okay.   My last blog post was about fear.  This one is about hope.  Yes, even as he officially enters teendom as a young person with FASD, I dare to focus this post on hope. In fact, I insist on focusing on hope.  It’s right there in the title of this blog.  It is at the core of everything we do as a family.  We hope.  We learn.

As our not-so-little-one becomes a teen, I am celebrating all that he is and will be.

You are shaking your head.  Yes, you can remind me of this when we hit the bumpy times we know are coming.  You may think I am naïve.  I get that.

But whatever you might think of this bright-eyed jump into the teenage wasteland, please know, I am not naïve.  I am making a choice.  And I am making that choice publicly because I believe we need to change the image we all have of teens with FASD. We have to change the narrative.  Reframe the language.

The statistics are cruel for those with FASD.  This is not the place to repeat them.  I am celebrating a rite of passage.  In fact, today, I defy those statistics.  Today, I celebrate a young determined soul who I believe can find his way forward, with our help and patience and perseverance.

I know he can.  Here is why I know that.

  1. He is identifying his feelings – using GIFS and Tom and Jerry cartoons, he is showing me what he sometimes feels like when rage boils over, when the forbidden words pour out, when he can’t contain the big emotions or when he makes choices he later understands were not the best. If he can find various ways to identify and communicate those intense emotions and begin to analyse them, we can find a way to implement strategies to help.
  2. He is using phrases like “My brain is saying I am not ready for that.” “My stomach doesn’t want that now.” “My body isn’t ready for that.”  He is learning to understand and read his internal signals.  We work with him on this all the time so that eventually he can become more analytical and learn to focus his mind on ways to help redirect his feelings and urges.
  3. The word “dysregulated” has become part of his vocabulary. He understands there are times when his brain becomes overwhelmed, the importance of finding calm in those moments.  He is devising his own strategies, and he knows that we will help him.  This is not to say meltdowns don’t happen, but this growing awareness is the foundation for moving forward to a time when he will be better able to self-regulate.  He is beginning to learn the lingo he will need for the rest of his life.  We do not keep FASD in a box around here.  We embrace it and discuss it and accept what it means when those neural connections that don’t work in the same way as others might.
  4. His school anxieties have dramatically decreased following the move from mainstream to a specialist school. This is an epic shift.  This school year started with some of the most distressing and challenging times we have had as a family.  He was anxious. We worried he was becoming defeated.  Following his switch to a special school in November, the year ended a few days ago with an entirely different reality.  The change happened quickly, efficiently.  I know that all too many are denied this sort of a quick response and that the changes in setting do not always solve all the problems – but his experience shows that if we get it right, even very drastic behaviours and problems can change fairly quickly.  There is hope.
  5. He feels secure in his place in our world. Even as he sometimes wants to run on impulse – “escape” as he calls it – our newly-minted teen knows that we love him unconditionally and this really is his forever family.  He knows this and come what may – remember, I am not naïve, I know there are rough days coming – he will always have our love.  That knowledge hopefully will help guide him through whatever storms may be ahead.
  6. He finds joy. In our son’s case, he immerses himself in music.  He is good at it.  It consumes his thoughts and it links in with movement and muscles and his inner beat.  He dances and sings and performs.  His very being glows while he is doing it.  Every teen, every child has some one thing that they enjoy and are good at.  For our guy, this is his gift.  We structure so much of his life around this and together we can find a space to simply celebrate his achievements.  May he always find joy, I believe that is tied closely with self-esteem.  And it is self-esteem that will see him through to those (in my mind) magical mid-twenties when (we hear) things start to even out for many with FASD as their emotions and social understandings begin to catch up to their actual age. Sitting on a bean bag chair with him, I started to wonder if my rosy picture of life is justified.  As a quick test, I just asked him to choose how he sees himself:

Happy or sad – “happy”

Strong or weak – “strong”

Kind or unkind – “kind”

Good or bad – “good”

Loving or mean – “loving, of course”

Gentle or rough – “gentle”

In these answers, which go to the heart of his self-perception, lies his future.  If you have read this blog, you know our home is not always peaceful and sweet – the fact that even with those times that can be measured on the Richter Scale, our son still understands that he is good and wonderful – he can separate out his brain challenges from the core of who he is.  As one friend, Savanna Pietrantonio (an adult with FASD who co-adminsters the Flying With Broken Wings Facebook group and the Hamilton, CA FASD support group) said recently, this is key.

I know, I really do know that these teenage years can rip into a person’s psyche and tear apart their faith in the future.  I know, really know that good parents, carers, guardians and others trying to support those with FASD sometimes face walls and hurdles that make navigating these years impossibly hard.

The issues compound in ways we are only just beginning to experience here.  I get it that the mix of hormones, accelerating tensions/anxieties, the growing social mismatch with peers, the desires for freedom and experimentation, the challenges of not being able to identify risk and manipulation (especially in this digital world), the coming encounters with a justice system that doesn’t understand FASD, the escalations (and perhaps danger) that can occur once strength and muscle can back up those meltdowns that at times simply have to run their course, the offense that can be caused by impulse, lack of self-editing (aided by increasingly distressing language), the scary realities that can intertwine when sex, drugs, and alcohol are teamed up with a complete lack of cause/effect reasoning.  I know, I know, I know.  Self-harm, suicide, crime, depression, psychiatric conditions, homelessness, early and unplanned parenthood… I know these are very real risks and life can become impossibly hard.  I have read the statistics.  I am in regular contact with people who were themselves contributors to those statistics.  I have open eyes.

And by insisting on hope, I am not judging.  Just as I don’t want to be judged, I don’t judge other families.  Every situation is different, unique, and has its own challenges.  One thing is sadly for sure – nearly every individual with FASD and their families have at some point been disappointed or let down by The System.  There are reasons – too often structural reasons – why so many find these teenage years difficult and demoralising, why even some of those whose families have absorbed all the strategies still wrestle with these years.  The delays.  The times when diagnosis was denied or when calls for help and were turned away.  When a young, vulnerable person was not deemed to be deserving of support and floundered as a result. There are reasons.  None of it is due to a young person or a family who deliberately gave up, no one wanted or desired those sometimes tragic outcomes.

I hear it.  I see it.  I get it.  And yet…

I also see the incredible resilience of those who nevertheless find their way forward through the ‘fog’ (as R.J. Formanek, an adult with FASD sometimes calls it – check out the amazing Facebook Group he co-adminsters – Flying with Broken Wings – for insights).

Until we can look at these teenage years with hope, until we can see the strategies to get us through, until we can join hands with our struggling young people with FASD and show them that they are not alone in their struggles and that there is a way forward, those statistics won’t change.  It’s one of the reasons why I am so inspired by the new National FASD Advisory Committee here in the UK, comprised of adults with FASD who are going to be advising NOFAS-UK on a project focused on Transitions to Adulthood.

We have to match teen’s talents with their potential.  We have to build education and programmes that help them bridge these years into adulthood – even if their walk across that bridge takes longer than for others.  We have to show them role models and hook them up with people who don’t only see their “problems” but who also see their magnificence.  We have to teach strategies for self-regulation and give them (and all those around them) increased literacy of their condition.  We have to wrap them in belief that they can do this, they will do this, that we have their backs.

Our little one is now a teenager.  And I am so excited to be by his side, watching as he unfolds his future.  Our family is united and learning (his 13th birthday presents included a giant bean bag chair, a homemade body sock, and other sensory supports all of which he was excited to receive).  Together we are getting better at navigating and minimizing those truly rough moments.  I won’t say life is easy, in fact it can be extremely hard sometimes.

But without doubt (and our teen knows it), I am proud of his every day and I am so looking forward to watching him rock this world.  I will be the one, front row, cheering him on.  Because he is Super.

 

 

 

Fighting Fear

Blog_FearOfFutureBy @SB_FASD

Help me.

I am a strong woman, from a long line of women who don’t back down or shy away from hard times.  But one thing has the power to bring me to my knees and that is fear for my children’s tomorrows.

The day we received the diagnosis* for our youngest son, my picture of the future imploded.  I nearly suffocated with the news.  We were swimming, uncertain what came next. We dove into Google where I soon kept coming across that one horrible image that is shared everywhere comparing the brain of a ‘normal’ child with that of a child with FASD…maybe you’ve seen it – that image where the folds of the brain seem all flat and shriveled, like the future I saw slipping away.  That photo knocked the wind out of me.   The post-diagnosis period was hard.  It took a long time to get to solid ground.

It took way too long for me to learn that photo no more represents my child’s brain than a flat and two-dimensional landscape represents my child’s future.  (While people share it with good intentions, the photo is an extreme case – a research photo that should perhaps never have escaped medical journals.  No one can live with a brain that looks like that.  It does show the damage alcohol can do when it does its worst, but I will not share the image in case it sets someone back like it set me back at a time when I needed to see forward.)

Fear of the future.  It’s always there.  We can put on a game face and we can meet the challenges head on.  But in a world where even doctors refuse to diagnose and support people who face this life with brain damage due to prenatal alcohol exposure, this journey deflates even the most determined of us all.

It’s pretty darn hard to get up the gumption again and again to push for support and services when those pushing back have degrees dripping off their walls.  The internal scream just builds and builds until my head is reverberating with the thought – this is so unfair!  This is a medical issue.  My son has Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, the leading cause of non-genetic intellectual disability in the Western world as noted in a report by the British Medical Association.  It is one of the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD).  FASD is real – it isn’t nothing, it’s not just ‘a label’ to excuse ‘bad parenting’ – it’s a lifelong brain-based disability known to have more than 400 co-occurring conditions.  It leads to devastating secondary disabilities if the underlying needs aren’t met.  And yet parents, carers and guardians are often asked time and again why they want a diagnosis by people who should know better – as if the diagnosis is some kind of optional add-on rather than central understanding needed for people to navigate their lives.

Why isn’t the medical field out there ahead on this, pushing prevention and early detection rather than making family after family feel inept, inadequate and undeserving of diagnosis, treatment and support?  That’s a serious question, one I am still waiting for someone to answer for me with anything that doesn’t smack of stigma-laden prejudice, self-centered justification of a pub culture that can’t look itself in the eye, or a burdened bureaucracy prepared to sacrifice some of its most vulnerable in the name of saving some small bit of money now despite knowing it will cost more in the long-run at the expense of too many promising young lives.

Fear of the future?  Heck yeah, when you are staring out at this world knowing at some point in the natural order of things you will die and your child will live on.  Knowing he will live on in a world that doesn’t care to understand him or his disability, a world that seems more likely than not to throw him in jail rather than support him or make accommodations for his needs.  Fear?  Darn right I am fearful.  I see the shadow in people’s eyes, as this sweet young boy turning toward adolescence is starting to lose his balance, getting swamped by the hormonal storms coming his way, not fitting in the boxes society has lined up for ‘good boys.’  Fear?  Oh yes.  I fear.  I hear too many stories, feel the anguish of too many lost young adults and families when these young souls get caught up in the chaos of young adulthood, the challenges of being emotionally and socially unready in a world that wants them to grow up faster than they are able.

Frightened and fearful.  Yes, that is me.  More times than I may seem.  But I refuse, downright refuse to let that fear stop me from doing everything I possibly can to create the best possible chance for my son to have the future he deserves.  I will stare down anyone who gives him ‘the look.’  I will drown any professional who doubts his right to services with enough paper and proof to convince them to either deal with his FASD or refer him forward.  If someone tells me he is ‘incapable of learning’ as did one educational psychologist early on (pre-diagnosis), that person sure as heck will never be within a mile of my son again.  I will fight against this fear.  And encourage any others I can to hold tough, stand tall, push forward.  Because together, collectively, we can change this.

We are afraid of the future, yes, but we focus that fear to make us more powerful and stronger advocates, determined to learn what we can to create the best possible outcome for our son and the other children with FASD who deserves a chance.

But let’s be honest.  It is lonely and scary to stand where we are on the near edge of the adolescent years.  There is a way to bridge the wild waters of the coming teenage years.  Even as I know the fall down can be hard and brutal, I know there is a way to make it across.  I have the honour and privilege to know adults with FASD and their families who have made it to the other side.  They are good people living good lives – contributing to society in all kinds of ways.  They are loved and loving.  Their lives may not be easy but they are profound. They have truths to tell and songs to sing.  No, I can’t – I won’t – let the fear paralyse me now, or we will stumble, fall, slide.  I will not get caught up in the trap of negativity.

I keep eyes forward.

I walk side by side with our son.  Come what may.

He struggles against me, yearns for an independence he cannot yet handle.

Every step scares the heck out of me.

I hope (and yes, for him I even pray to whoever might be listening) that this walk across these teenage years will be gentle.

If he is in trouble, may he get help not judgement, compassion not intolerance.

If he strays into dangerous waters, may someone offer him a lifeline and not an anchor.

If he loses his way, finds himself drifting or spinning out of control, may someone ground him rather than send him further away from me.

May he not get tangled up in something that can drag him down.

If he calls for help but in a language others can’t hear, may someone see his shining soul and recognise his innocence and bring him home.

This boy had to fight for existence without love for the first 16 months of his life.  The world has already proven once to him how cruel it can be – it left him speechless, untrusting, hungry for something more.

Please, let me suppress this fear long enough to get him to solid ground.

Help me help him.

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[*If you are new to a diagnosis – please see this resource: Information for parents/carers following a diagnosis of FASD by Dr. Cassie Hunt, Highly Specialist Clinical Psychologist. You don’t need to flounder as much as we did.]