Be an Adopter

Be an adopter!

By MB_FASD

It’s National Adoption Week and the theme this year is “The Adopter”. Since that’s me, and my wife, and also my mum, I thought I’d write something for the occasion. Hopefully, some of you out there thinking of adopting will find a spark here, some inspiration that will confirm that for you adoption is the right thing to do. I really do hope so. Adoption is a wonderful experience. For you. For your child. And for all involved. As long as it’s done right.

First of all, do it for the right reasons. Be sure you’re not wanting to ‘save’ a child. You’ll hear from friends and family that you’ve done a wonderful, charitable thing by giving a home to a needy child. If that’s your reason, don’t adopt. Adopt because you want a family, or you want to complete your family. Because you want the love and joy a child will bring into your life and have plenty of your own to share.

Secondly, understand that adoption has changed from the old days, when those of us who were adopted as babies were likely to have been given up by single mothers shamed into allowing us to be adopted by the dark, somewhat unforgiving social mores of the time. We were largely newborns, healthy and (at least in my case, handsome and adorable 😊). Those kids available for adoption now are still adorable, but they’re unlikely to be newborns and their pathway to adoption is different than mine. They will have suffered neglect, early life trauma, may well have a disability and/or other health issues. They may have an attachment disorder. Or, and here’s why this blog is writing about adoption, they may well have a Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

Statistics on FASD are not good amongst looked after children up for adoption. The condition is very much under-reported, under-diagnosed and poorly understood or recognised by midwives, social workers, GPs and even Paediatricians. A study in Peterborough showed that 75% of children available for adoption had been exposed to alcohol in utero. That doesn’t mean the kids have an FASD, but the risk is there, and it is significantly higher than for the population as a whole.

As an adopter, bringing a child with FASD into your life will be a huge change. Our son has brought music and performance into our home. He takes us to places we would otherwise not go. He has brought the widest smiles of joy. He has taught us much about ourselves and our capabilities to care.

But it isn’t easy.

Kids with FASD have executive functioning deficits which means they constantly need help to organise themselves through life. Many have learning disabilities. They have sensory needs that are difficult to meet. They can meltdown with a depth and severity that is extremely hard to manage. Doctors fail to recognise the condition. Social workers don’t write up maternal alcohol consumption in notes, making diagnosis harder later on. Therapists of all kinds don’t know about FASD and struggle to adapt their services for our kids.

To be an adopter, you will need deep reserves of resilience and humour and love to do everything your child will need, and everything your wider family will need. You will have to possess a desire to learn all you can to support a young person, and to show your family, friends and the professionals in education, medicine and social work how to support him and you.

Society also needs to better support adopters who make the decision to adopt a child with FASD, or one who may well have the condition (you might not know for sure since FASD is so under-diagnosed). To be an adopter, you’ll become a campaigner for recognition of FASD in the educational system. You’ll become an advocate for the wider needs of families with kids with SEN, things like more respite breaks (or indeed access to respite breaks at all!!) and for the reasonable adjustments all institutions should make for kids with a disability under the 2010 Equality Act. Sounds scary, but it’s doable. You’ll be a better parent for meeting the challenge.

So, be an adopter of a child with an FASD. Go into it with eyes open. Read up about FASD. Join support communities like FASD UK’s closed group on Facebook. Get materials from NOFAS-UK and other groups working on the condition.

And if, after a good hard consideration of the idea, you think you’re up for it don’t let four letters and all they mean deprive you of the love a child with an FASD can bring into your home, or stop you giving them the loving home they need to thrive.

*********
For more information:
National Organisation for Foetal Alcohol Syndrome-UK (NOFAS-UK)
Adoption UK

Take Care

Blog_TakeCare4

By MB_FASD (and a side note from SB_FASD)

And so, from hour to hour, we ripe and ripe.
And then, from hour to hour, we rot and rot;
And thereby hangs a tale.
(As You Like it, William Shakespeare)

I like a good Shakespeare quote, and this one fits the circumstances of the past couple of weeks, at least for me.

Parents and carers of kids with FASD are busy. So busy. There’s never enough time. There just isn’t. For us, when you aren’t dealing with the day to day, then there is the relationship with school to manage, or appointments at the doctor, a seemingly endless round of trips to one hospital or another, from therapist to counsellor, from consultant to nurse. Even the extra loads of washing take time.

The supervision of the day takes a huge amount of energy, and at almost any time, a meltdown can bring everything to halt for hours while we help our young man to re-regulate and things can get back to (FASD) normal.

When you combine all this with work, the rest of the family and everyday life, time is squeezed. There just aren’t enough hours in the day. So things slide. Sometimes important things. That’s what’s been happening to me. I let things go by that I should have been noticing, or I did notice but didn’t pay attention to. My wife worried at me to look after mysef, to get some checks done. And I brushed her advice off.

Sinking into the sofa exhausted at the end of the day, every day, had become my normal. Having a little afternoon nap had become normal. I got extremely thirsty all the time. I felt below par every day. This was my normal. And I wrote it off to the stress of living with a child with FASD (and another with chronic fatigue).

I did nothing.

But, it came back to haunt me. Just like the advice on the aeroplane, if the oxygen mask falls then put your own on before trying to assist others, I should have been taking care of myself.

A couple of weeks ago I went to the doctor complaining of a persistent cough, which had lasted since a virus knocked me flat in February and triggered my asthma. She asked a lot of questions, and sent me for blood tests and chest x-rays.

Fast forward a few days and the doctor’s surgery calls and tells me to come in that morning. An hour later she tells me I have Type 2 diabetes, and after discussion, I have probably been in an acute phase of the condition for at least 18 months. Looking at the blood sugar results she tells me it’s ‘a bloody miracle’ I’m not in a coma.

Later, with the diabetes nurse, she shows me how to use a blood sugar testing monitor. The result is too high for the machine to read – it just says “HI” on its little screen, meaning my blood sugar is over 33, when I’m aiming for 8! For good measure I need to get my cholestorol level down. And lose a bit of weight, although I’ve lost two stone since the doctor last weighed me as a result of the untreated diabetes.

Back home, my diet changes immediately. Gone are the carbs, salty and sugary items that made up a lot of my diet – and that includes the grapes and yogurts I was eating a lot of. Convenience eating is a thing of the past. Everything is measured, considered and prepared from scratch. My wife is delighted about this bit, and a Mediterranean Cooking for Diabetics book appears immediately. She gets to cook all sorts of things she loves!

Two weeks on (with the help of some meds) my blood sugar is low and relatively stable. I’m learning to live with diabetes and starting to feel better. I’m not getting up two or three times a night to pee. I’m feeling more rested from a night’s sleep. I’m less prone (I think, check in with my wife) to being irritable because of fatigue. Things are on the up.

This means more energy to deal with the things that life throws at you. More energy to look after our son. I’ve started taking care of myself, and it means I am in two short weeks, better able to take care of him.

And that, in a nutshell, is the moral of the story. Take the time to take care of yourself, so you can take care of the others in your life. And how necessary is that when you have a young one with FASD in the family. They need you to be at the top of your game. Every day.

Listen to your body. Act on the signals it sends. Try not to “rot and rot” as the bard put it.

Take care.

*********

A note from SB

I knew he was sick. He says I “worried” at him. It was more than that. I knew what I was seeing, my father had diabetes. Combined with high cholesterol and heart issues, diabetes took my dad’s foot and contributed to years of very bad health leading to an early death.
 
I was scared by what I was seeing.
 
And yet, the days and weeks and months and possibly years passed. I cannot tell you how guilty I felt when I realised not just that he has diabetes, but how serious it had become.
 
Because of FASD, we are faced every day with the kind of in-your-face urgent issues that cannot be ignored. Of course we are tired. Of course we are snappy with each other. Of course we feel down. Of course we take short cuts. Our interactions have been curt and far from the hours-long discussions we used to have about issues big and small. I felt he was being selfish by not looking after himself. I felt he was whinging. I grew up in a “if-your-cut-hand-is-not-falling-off-keep-playing” kind of large family. I had told him (repeatedly, and even in front of his mother a couple of times) what I thought was wrong. If he chose not to act on it, I was not going to nag. 

Except I didn’t grant him, my partner in this life, the same courtesy I grant to our child with FASD.  I never thought he was as badly affected as he is and that a medical condition might be underlying behaviours. I nearly cried when one of my sister-in-law’s friends who has diabetes said that she had never heard of anyone having readings as high as his and that this must be making it really hard for him to control mood swings. I didn’t for a second imagine his outbursts that threw me through the roof myself might actually be due to blood sugar swings. I didn’t think his behaviour might be a symptom too – and that is the mantra of FASD parenting. I should have trusted my lovely husband enough to see this for what it was.
 
I feel guilty.
 
Deep, deep guilt. 
 
I am surrounded by people who have medical conditions that are demanding. Diabetes. FASD. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/ME. I am certain the stress we all live under is playing a negative role in all of this. I myself was in hospital a couple of years ago with neurological issues.

This life is not easy. There’s no outlet, no fun, no release. Or at least we don’t prioritise finding ways to lighten our load. I always feel there is more I should be doing. And now I need to learn about carbohydrates that convert from sugars and figure out how to integrate new foods into a home where one of us has major sensory issues related to food. I am a short order chef these days, making multiple foods. More pressure. (Yes, I bought the Mediterranean Cookbook for Diabetics, sure, but I have yet to read it.)

The pace is relentless. But if you are reading this, most likely you are familiar with it.

We are not alone. I know of too many individuals and families coping with FASD where the stresses drive peoples’ health into the ground, where relationships get torn to the point of no return, where depression takes hold. 

We have to do better. As my husband says above, we have to “take care”.  We have to take care of ourselves and we also have to take care of each other too…maybe a bit more aggressively than the British culture is comfortable with. Maybe we need to force those difficult conversations. Lives are at stake. This isn’t optional.

I am glad he caught this before worse harm was done. I am thankful it’s something we can manage. He didn’t mention above that they also were screening for cancer at the same time. There is a reason why we haven’t posted a blog post in a little while. It’s been quite a ride around here lately. 
 
…now, where is that reminder about the smear I was due for ages ago…?

SaveSave

SaveSave

Father Christmas Finds It Hard

Blog Father Christmas loves a teen with FASD

By MB_FASD
It’s hard being a Dad to a son with FASD at this time of year. You want him to be happy, but the run up to Christmas is stressful for him, and that makes it hard for us. How do you keep him going when the routine at at school is swept away, making him nervous every morning when he wakes up? How can I reassure him that his meltdowns, bad language and FASD-provoked behaviours don’t mean he’s on Father Christmas’ naughty list, with no chance of redemption., a constant fear he raises? I worry that his fears lead to a cycle of worsening anxiety and deteriorating behaviour. I have to do what I can to help reinforce the positive, help build up his confidence and self-esteem. But, oh my, the weeks before Christmas are not a good time.

This year, a whole number of new factors have been thrown into our volatile mix.

Back in late October our son had an operation on his right hand. He’s still recuperating from that. He can’t do gymnastics, or play in soft play areas, or go trampolining, or even go to a playground. He can’t do anything that risks putting pressure on the hand, or injuring it during this recovery period. These are his big physical outlets, things he does all the time. It makes life much harder when he can’t release his pent-up energy. He’s even too worried to go to swimming, I offered to take him last weekend and he wouldn’t go as “the Doctor has to say it’s ok”. He needs these activities to help him regulate his emotions and behaviour. I haven’t cracked this one. I hope as the hand heals his worries will pass and I’ll be able to get him in the pool again, most likely with one of his good friends who also swims like a dolphin.

Another thing we have had to be very engaged with is his school play. This isn’t an average school performance, his school has a performing arts speciality. The quality of their productions is fantastic. Everything is on a professional footing. His first one, last Spring, was a triumph for him and the school. He loved it. This time has been harder. He learned his lines, but wasn’t able to come out of himself to show what he could do in rehearsal. I read through lines with him a couple of times, but it didn’t help. He’s been reserved, silent, not responding properly to prompts. His anxiety is compounded by his voice changing as he goes through puberty. He’s finding it hard to hit the high notes. His voice sometimes cracks, and he hates that. He has perfect pitch, and is hyper-self-critical of anything that he perceives as less than his best. He hears imperfections we don’t hear. His self-confidence takes a hit when he thinks things aren’t right.

Worst of all, a shattering blow to the whole family, Sir Noel the Wonder Dog, our little Cavalier King Charles Spaniel collapsed and died of heart failure. I traumatised a young woman at the pet insurance firm by bursting into floods of tears when I rang to cancel the policy. Noel was the rescue dog who came to us a few Christmases ago. He was so much more than a pet. He was a physical comfort for our son at times of dysregulation and emotional disturbance or upset. He was a tool that our son used to regulate himself, projecting a voice onto Noel was a way for our son to tell himself to behave, to not be rude, to be nice at times when he was cursing or verging on meltdown. Losing his partner in struggles with FASD, one of his biggest comforts in life, was especially traumatic as it came at a time of year when he needed Noel more than ever. He’s still talking about Noel, asking questions, looking at pictures. Needing his Mum and I to provide answers we don’t have. Working his way through complicated issues like has Noel found my Dad in heaven? Are they going for walks together? Apparently, the answers are yes and yes. Noel is happy wherever he is. Our son found these answers for himself. I was a sounding board, nothing more, and his Mum did most of the work.

I have to keep in my head every day that these factors don’t stand alone. They compound to drive up levels of stress and anxiety until, facing overload, meltdowns become inevitable as sensory and mental processing is no longer possible. It’s my job, with the rest of the family, to keep all the stresses and strains to a minimum. To be there, a support, a facilitator.

The brain damage of FASD means that screaming, crying, hitting, throwing terrible meltdowns happen. When a child is overwhelmed by circumstance and simply can’t react rationally any more, meltdowns happen. Our son, in common with others, just gets overwhelmed. The flight and flight centre of the brain takes over. He can no longer control what he does. He needs absolute calm and a lot of time and space to let the thinking part of his brain take over once again. We have to give him that space, make sure he is safe, he knows we are there when he can reach out. Sometimes that is very difficult indeed, but it is what has be done.

At this time of year, these problems are his, our, norm. Those overwhelming moments come more often than not. In an average year the run-up to Christmas is enough to provoke meltdowns. This year it should have been so much worse.

But, it isn’t.

We haven’t escaped entirely. This afternoon dominos have been hurled across the room, and expletives have blistered the air. A few days ago I got in the way during another meltdown and got hurt. Repetitive swearing has been heard.

But these incidents have passed, and passed quite quickly. They haven’t led to big, all-encompassing and violent meltdowns that last hours. These episodes have subsided as quickly as they erupted. Calmness has returned, leg and foot rubs have been quickly accepted. Dysregulation has swiftly become self-regulation once again. Even with the distress at the loss of Noel the Loving, our son has been able to regain lost control. He’s been able to ask for support.

How is this possible? Well, partly he’s changing. He’s growing up. We have worked very, very hard at helping him recognise the symptoms of a coming meltdown. We have had help from experts for a couple of years in giving him tools to manage meltdowns. His aunt the actor helped him through difficulties and taught a technique to hit the high notes even though it’s hard. This made a huge difference when the nights of the play came around. What might have been a step too far just wasn’t. It was hard, right up to the last minute he was saying he couldn’t do it. But he did. Two duets were a triumph. And he spoke his words with feeling and expression. He was able to get to the point where he happily soaked in the applause at the end, even while he watched the snowflake lights spin around the hall.

Importantly, we have listened to the maxim that you can’t change the child, so you have to change their environment. We have changed what we do at home to be more responsive to his needs. We skip events if he can’t handle them (we missed carol singing as I wrote this). We give him space. We leave everything as calm as possible. We haven’t done nearly as much as we should – our house is still cluttered, but what we have done has worked. I have tried hard to modify my behaviour around him. I have tried to learn the techniques that work with him.

I’ve become a different Dad, the one he needs. At least, I’m getting there.

Perhaps most of all, he’s out of mainstream school and into a place that gets him. They help him thrive. The removal of mainstream school curriculum that he couldn’t cope with has decreased stress dramatically. And their marvellous support has helped him grow.  The teachers, and the aforementioned aunt, have built up his confidence so he could get to the end of the show and soak up the applause.

So, the takeaway from all this?

Life with a child with FASD is never easy. Being a Dad in these circumstances is a challenge. But things change, he changes, the world around him changes, and if it’s bad at the moment, it doesn’t always need to be that way.

And, even when the worst happens, there is hope. Or in this case Joy. Joy is a rescue puppy who will be joining us very soon. She won’t be Sir Noel the Brave, but she will come to be a support and a companion our son needs.

Things can very definitely get better.