Clearing Shelves Stacked with Someone Else’s Dreams

Blog_CleaningRoom2

By SB_FASD

Oh sweet child, today you asked to clear out your room. You have been saying for weeks that you wanted to do this. I kept finding excuses. I didn’t want to face what I knew was coming. But you dove into the project. Knowing how this sort of task can easily overwhelm you, I calmly said I’d help, even though it was early and I was tired, un-caffeinated and unconvinced.

And soon there we were, knee deep in the tomorrows I had thought you’d have as you swept away my earlier visions of the way your future might unfold. The future I was creating for you in my mind, before we understood your FASD.

“You bought me too many books.” Yes, I suppose we did. I said, “I know, but we used to read them together.” You replied, “I don’t like books with too many chapters, too many words.” I know that now. You suggested we could get more workbooks. You wanted to keep exercise books. “I have too many copies of ‘Alice in Wonderland,’” you said. Because, my son, at one time you were completely and utterly engrossed in Alice, you fixated on the fantasy world. We watched movies. We read books. We watched an Alice ballet. But okay, now I see you are ready to move on.

“These books are baby-ish,” you said, sweeping away the books about bugs, about colds, about how children lived in Anglo-Saxon days. The books with pictures that we spent hours looking at, making up stories when reading was too hard. The kids’ joke books you loved but never really ‘got’. This isn’t the first time we have culled these shelves. Some of these books are ones we thought might give you some important info in a more accessible way. But you’re right. They are for much younger kids.

Some books stayed – Spy Kids, all the playbills from the many plays you have seen, a collection of the later Biff and Chip books, the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series. And of course Amelia Bedelia. She is so literal and she tries so very hard, just like you. You still laugh when she gets herself into a pickle every time.

We understood at a point that you do better with chunks of information, accompanied by visuals. So we have a large collection of DK Eyewitness Books that you and your brother used to page through – covering everything from the weather to history to the Titanic (that one you kept).

Book by book, I had to bite back my regrets. All those Dr Suess books that I adore but that I know now must have completely confused you with their nonsense words and silly pictures. I held in my arms some of the great children’s literature I loved as a child, trying to decide if I am ready to let go of my dreams of reading these with you, knowing I must.

And the toys and games. “I hate puzzles.” I flashed back to so many times we tried to do puzzles with you as a young child. You would get so frustrated. You had to try the piece every which way until it eventually fit. Even if it was a triangle into a square hole. You kept at it, determined. You did eventually get there. I had no idea then how your brain struggles to think abstractly. That practical trial-and-error approach was you trying your absolute hardest. A reminder for me of the way you learn best – hands on, experientially. I stared at the newer 120- and 200- piece puzzles, agreeing we could get rid of those now.

Today you were prioritising you. Rightly so.

I am proud of you. It can’t have been easy to move me into action. I am sorry it had to take such sheer determination on your part. I should have been listening more closely.

But I would be lying if it didn’t admit that I spent the day grieving in a way I haven’t done in a long time. I spent the day missing those earlier years when it was easier to get you to do what I thought was best. I spent the day second guessing myself, as I accepted again that I don’t always know best. You have always shown me what you need. How hard it is sometimes to listen.

We say it all the time, that young people with FASD are often socially and emotionally half of their chronological age: “stage, not age.” But these teenage years are tricky. That ‘rule’ doesn’t apply evenly and it’s not consistent. It’s dependent on lots of things. In a day you can go from being quite surprisingly mature to acting like a much, much younger child. Sometimes your insights catch my breath. Other times, I feel fear when I have to repeat something very basic that I know you once knew. I really don’t know everything that you need these days. You are a glorious mix.

You are all about music, electronics. You have taken on board the idea that sensory items help you, so we kept a shelf free for the slime. Today, in a new toy store full of toys, you chose a sensory bed tent. It has a light inside. And a unicorn on the outside. You still want us to create a stage in your room with curtains that open and close with a string. We will try. I am not convinced you really wanted to get rid of the dreamcatcher and the emoji pillows. I was surprised you asked for us to bring the Lego back in your room. Then I grew worried as storm clouds gathered when you wanted to recreate a Lego schoolhouse that you long ago smashed apart. The pieces are mixed in with thousands of other Lego pieces now, making it unlikely we can recreate that model.

So, where is all of this going?

When we first started pulling apart your room, my original plan was to put those DK Eyewitness Books on a bookshelf in another room. But I have been staring at them long and hard. When you want to know something, you google it. You learn from YouTube videos. This is a real strength you have, your ability to navigate online. You are not ever going to go to those books for information. I get that. I have to let them go.

I have to let it all go.

I love you so very much. I know these things mean nothing in the long run. You are doing so very well, as you learn to understand your body and your sensory needs, as you show us your strengths that come from having a mind that works differently.

You have a rack full of sparkly dress up clothes. You love performing.  Your Christmas list is full of special lights, music and technology. Your dreams are in some ways larger than life. But who among us dares to limit you? You are so talented, who knows where they may lead? So, yes, I will sweep clear those shelves so you have room for disco lights and microphones and amplifiers and speakers.

I promise I will try to remember that in your 14-year old body is a unique and growing young soul that needs to feel comfort and nourishment in the items that surround him, whose room should not be a place where he looks around and feels inadequacy in failing to meet someone else’s vision.

It had never occurred to me that you saw those things in your room as my failure to understand you and what you really like.

Dear amazing you, thank you once again for teaching me what I needed to learn.

(Now, how do we get rid of all of this stuff out of our bedroom, where it landed throughout the day, leaving me with no path to walk?)