Ready for the Reset

Blog_WeFindPeace

By SB_FASD

There he was – swirling on a rope swing over a gentle stream, sploshing through the water with laughter and abandon.  Throwing rocks as far as he could (twice as far as me).  Talking with me about yesterday, about how when he feels like he needs to throw things hard, we can always come here.  Here it doesn’t matter.  Here it’s ok to want to smash and throw.  Here is a place where it’s ok.  We’re ok, my child.  Yesterday was hard, these weeks have been hard.  But we are okay.  We can find the laughter.  We can re-center ourselves.  There is always another time, another chance.

How I wish he could see forward in those moments when his world just seizes into the here-and-now-frenzy of “NOT!”  Not hearing.  Not reasoning. Not stopping.  Just riding out that intensity of the NOT! in the only way he knows how as of now – the knock-down, smash-it-out, take-no-prisoners meltdown.  Maybe you know it – the one that leaves you stunned, drained, bewildered…standing outside a door you can’t open but can’t leave.  The one that makes you feel so small in the face of the tangled neural networks that work against the peace you hope to achieve.  The tsunami of emotions that must play out.  The one you can’t let drown you even as you find yourself choking on despair in the face of your loved one’s torment.

FASD is cruel at times.  It’s bald and raw and fierce.

Trapped inside always trying to conform, sometimes it breaks free and just lets fly.

I get it.  I have in my own life wished at times for such abandon.  I have at times wanted to throw, scream, shout my truth whether or not it hurt others or myself.  And I don’t have to squeeze myself every day into rooms that are not made for me, trying to mold my mind to tiny boxes others want me to tick because it’s easier for them, no matter how hard it is for me.  I don’t spend my days clashing against others’ expectations that few people untangle for me so I can actually understand them.  I don’t have to live my life always feeling like I am just not allowed to be who I am.  I have empathy in boatloads. I get it, I do.

Even as the worst of it flies, I get it.

Or at least, I can try to imagine it.  I know I will never really understand it, because I don’t live it.  How very important it is to listen to those adults with FASD who can give voice to what the littles ones can’t yet find the words to say.  How lucky we are that there are those willing to help us understand.  I try, try, try.  To support.  To do better.  To protect.

But “getting it” (or trying to) still doesn’t make it easy.  That doesn’t mean sometimes I don’t want to cry.  The big cosmic stinking situation that left this person facing such challenges through no fault of their own.  It’s not just.  It isn’t.  Sometimes i am discouraged to the core, worn down to the bones from trying and never feeling I have done enough.   No, it’s not easy.

But even still, I am unbudge-able on one thought – there is hope.

I am learning.  I too am growing.  I know I need to be patient.  This is a long game.

These frenzied horrible moments eventually pass.  Sometimes it seems the episodes are shorter.  Less frequent.  Glimmers of the strategies we practice shine through.  I notice tiny progress – or maybe it’s huge?  Maybe the destruction wasn’t as great as it might have been–was there a dawning awareness, a guiding hand, an emerging instinct helping to avoid the worst of it?  It’s hard to know sometimes.  We are improving our ability to speak about it after – we really are learning the shared language of this disability, its dysregulation, and the lingo of how FASD affects brains.  We find peace again sooner – between us, and as a family.  We have learned how to ask for external help when we need it, and we have done the legwork to be sure when we send up the bat signal, as I did yesterday, people know how to help.  They knock on the door.  Like the first responders they are, they rush in when others might run in the opposite direction.

I have learned to shed the resentment, the hurt.  When the moment passes, as it always does – I am ready for the reset.  It always comes.  (May it always come.  If I were a praying person, that would be my prayer.  May we always be ready to repair the space between us.)  That moment after, when we can start again.  Start stronger.  Move forward.  Grow.  I am ready.  And he too is learning to trust that better moment will come.

I am there.  I wait for the tiny “sorry mummy.”  I am ready with the lotion for a foot rub, close by to tuck the covers just so.  There to say for the gazillionth time (because that’s how we measure things around here), “It’s okay.  I love you. I’m good.  Are you good?”  Good. We’re good.

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For further information: FASD meltdowns are due to the brain-based issues related to FASD.  They are not tantrums, they are not intentional.  They are not always avoidable.  Anecdotally, we hear from adults with FASD that sometimes they are necessary.  It is essential to try to better understand these if you are trying to support someone with FASD – or if you yourself have FASD and don’t understand why you might have a meltdown.  Not everyone has the violent outbursts, but nearly everyone has that moment of brain overload that leads to an inability to move forward.

NOFAS-UK has a poster (originally from this blog) and some links to resources about meltdowns here.

Some earlier posts on this blog explored meltdowns from different perspectives:

FASD Meltdowns

A Timely Reminder About Dysregulation & FASD

Why a Broken Screen Can Make Me Feel Good

The Building Storm of an FASD Meltdown

 

 

Why a Broken Screen Can Make Me Feel Good

we-love-a-child-with-fasd-9By @FASD_Mum

I am willing to admit I might be grasping at straws here, but today the smashed screen of our son’s Amazon Fire Kid’s tablet represents progress to me.  I get that I may be taking counter-intuitive parenting to an extreme, but here’s what I have been thinking ever since this happened at about lunch time today:

  1. He instantly communicated he understood the trigger for him.  “I don’t like it when the games time out before I can finish!”
  2. He recognized that he could have handled his frustration better. “I always throw things too hard.”
  3. He came to find me after it happened. “I broke it.”
  4. He trusted he would not get in trouble.
  5. He tried to problem solve. “There aren’t too many cracks on it.”
  6. He did not have a meltdown, but wrapped up in his duvet like we have encouraged him to do.
  7. He did not break my phone, which was also within reach at the time.
  8. Within 15 minutes we were able to recover his good humour, and jolly him out the door to singing lessons, without any rooms being destroyed in the process.

From the parental side, we did better today (if we don’t count our one epic fail, which I will address below):

  1. We responded when we heard a problem, but not by going in with sirens blaring even though we kind of knew a piece of electronics had just been sacrificed.
  2. By mutual, unspoken consent I went forward first, gently asking what had happened.
  3. We did not erupt in frustrated and harried verbal sparring between us. We kept the tones low.
  4. My immediate response was to reassure him. “It’s okay.  You’re not in trouble.  Where is it?  Let me have a look.  It’s OK.  You didn’t mean to break it, did you?”
  5. I quietly moved the broken tablet out of view, and started to scratch his back.
  6. He was making noises from under the duvet cocoon he had created – I quietly asked him a question about something unrelated to get him talking and back into a verbal mode. I kept repeating it quietly, to give him time to register the question. “What songs are you going to sing today at voice lessons?”  Wait a few moments.  “What SONG do you think you are going to SING today?”    “Do you have a SONG?”  Repeating the main word, understanding he might only be hearing every third word or so until he calmed further.
  7. Without too many words, I helped him out of pjs and into his day clothes, even avoided things flying when he was having trouble getting his foot into his beloved new gold-plated heeled boots which @FASD_Dad had very wisely brought up, a silent encouragement that yes, he could wear these out today and isn’t that cool?
  8. I instantly responded positively when he suggested his singing teacher might like it if he were to bring her a treat, like sweets. Of course I knew he had ulterior motives, but I commended him on being very thoughtful in thinking what the teacher might like.  I did that on purpose, to start those positive feelings flowing again, to get to “yes” ground again after the negativity.
  9. When I said to @FASD_Dad that our guy wanted to stop at the shop for sweets, he had already heard the deal, quietly agreed without batting an eye and without mentioning smashed tablets, and they were off.
  10. After the singing lesson, @FASD_Dad kept him busy with some of his favourite Saturday activities- they went to the charity shops (where he scored his 2000th marble run), filled up on food at Subway (which was vital), before visiting his grandmother and The Auntie.
  11. When they came home, we all sat and watched a music DVD in the living room that is still filled with Christmas lights and the (artificial) Christmas tree because our guy (and his older brother it must be admitted) don’t want us to take them down. So we haven’t.

So, why am I feeling good?  As I say, I am willing to admit it might be grasping at straws.  The little one is up in bed.  He is calm and at peace.  We are all calm and at peace.  The house is kind of pretty in the multi-coloured glow.  Rather than feeling like a failure doomed to bad luck for not taking down these (minimal) decorations, I am seeing it as a positive.  I am responding to our guy’s wishes, giving him control over this – it hurts no one and he’s right, it’s kind of nice.  I guess I am feeling good because we are learning.  We are far from perfect, but we are learning.

Readers of the blog may recall some earlier catastrophes with tablets and phones, including The Worst Day Ever.  These incidents were horrible, traumatic, and had knock-on effects for weeks.  But, we have learned.  We got the Amazon Fire for Kids when it was on sale because it has a great kid-friendly replacement policy (or at least, we will see how parent-friendly that is in coming days).  We understood there was a risk, and we researched and took precautions so that we weren’t losing a ton of money.  We don’t get any electronics now without buying a replacement package.  Our son has a disability.  Things happen.

I also am pleased because even though electronics are a hot button between my husband and I sometimes, we worked through it today, in synch, and we are okay.  I am feeling good that our guy knew he could come to me even if something pretty bad on the scale of things in his world had happened, and that there is not one hole in one wall as part of the aftermath of frustration and hurt and disappointment that a favourite piece of electronics had been broken.

He will face some natural consequences.  He will have to bring an old Leap Pad with less grown up games on it during his 30-40 minute taxi rides to and from school until we can get the replacement sorted.  We will not hurry that process.  He will be without this for a while.  We will gently reinforce with him during this time that when he is feeling frustrated he should put down electronics and punch a pillow if he has to, or take deep breaths.  We will talk about this a lot, just not now.

Yes, it is counter-intuitive parenting.  In the world I grew up in I would have been sent to my room, grounded, and I would have had to work around the house to earn money to replace the item.  And that all would have made sense for the kid I was.

But we know our guy has brain injury that means he cannot always control his impulses.  That surge of frustration when that totally-annoying-game-just-did-not-give-him-enough-time-AGAIN-when-he-was-working-so-hard-and-was-nearly-there…that ARRRRGHHHHH moment that we can all recognize floods his system and because of the way his brain networks are wired, the other ‘thinking’ part of the brain sometimes just cannot kick in until, oh no! It’s already broken.  And-now-what-should-he-do?

There is no amount of ‘punishing’ that will change that wiring of his brain.  The best we can do is put in place strategies to ensure conditions are the best possible to avoid him getting that frustrated or overstimulated to begin with.

So, if there was an epic fail today, it was mine.  I was on the computer from the moment he came downstairs this morning and I knew he was on electronics for too long.  I made a choice this morning not to enforce our ‘no screens weekend mornings’ policy that has been completely ignored by us all over this past hectic month.  I knew it was getting late, he hadn’t eaten properly, and that he was likely to be unhappy about having to get ready to go to singing after a cozy morning at home staring at screens.  I could have, I should have headed this off.  He even said to me yesterday that I am on the computer too much.

I am not saying that to have others tell me I shouldn’t feel bad, and I shouldn’t kick myself.  I am not.  As I said, I am at peace.  I feel good.  I think I am speaking for my husband as well.  Today, we showed signs of growth as a family. We all of us – big and small – spotted where we slipped up, we talked about where we didn’t ‘follow the script’ and what impact that had.  We comforted each other, and we moved on and recovered.  So, yes.  It was a good day.

But I am not going to take credit for that.  Our guy is a super star. He is working at things.  He really is.  He is trying hard, in his way and in his own time, to implement the strategies.  He is more resilient than he has been in a long, long time.  We believe he is having a new chance at being able to do this because such huge pressures have been lifted from him by switching to a special school.  He had been using every last ounce of his will power to get through those school days in his old school.  Just yesterday, we were discussing that his appetite is starting to climb as well.  He actually wants to eat much more often than previously.  Across the board, we all are progressing.

So here’s the small hope we toss out there to those who might be needing it:  if we could crawl out of the hole we had been falling into, others can too.  I guess that is the main thought for the day.  These parenting strategies are not really rocket science.  But they rely on us practicing and developing different reflexes.  This doesn’t happen over night.  It is a process.  I am sure the pros out there are shaking their heads reading this, and I imagine they could find 50 things we did wrong today.  I am sure readers have spotted some things we could have done better as well.  We welcome advice and comments.  We are far, far, FAR from perfect.  We are muddling through.

But none of that changes the fact that for us, today, this was progress.  And in a world that moves fast and is full of tense and challenging moments, we have to take time to celebrate the positives.

So yes, I am choosing to look at that broken screen and allow myself to feel good.

Ten Tips for a Holly Jolly Christmas – Inclusion, FASD & That Christmas Dinner…

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By @FASD_Mum

Ho Ho Oh Boy – it’s Christmastime. Again.

For those in the greater FASD community who celebrate Christmas this time of year is challenging.  Feeling more like Scrooge than we care to admit, we jump out of bed each morning with an eye toward Christmases Past, Present & Future.

Christmas Past

We have suffered the defeat of Christmases past – when time and again expectations have been dashed by the hard realities of life for a child with FASD.  Flashing lights.  Sparkly tinsel.  Spinning decorations. Dropping pine needles.  Anticipation.  Confusion. Disbelief. Unbearable excitement.  Inevitable disappointment.

Ten Christmas truths as we have come to know them from Christmases Past:

  1. Not all kids can handle the idea of a big man dressed in red coming down imaginary chimneys.
  2. Some can handle even less the idea that it might not happen.
  3. Santa’s naughty or nice list can cause great anxiety for kids who have trouble controlling behaviour. In our house, kids know Santa gives points for trying.
  4. Schools have no clue how much toll those extra events can take on some kids. The lead up to The Day can be daily chaos for kids who need routine.
  5. It can matter greatly if a tree starts to shed its needles early. Last year our son panicked every day for a whole month.  This year we have an artificial tree.  (Still in its box along with all the other decorations, I might add.)
  6. Christmas light speed dials should be banned.
  7. That fact that it doesn’t snow in every town on Christmas Day can cause great distress for some kids who think Santa’s sleigh needs snow to land. This isn’t ‘cute’, this is a serious worry.
  8. Most toys have a half-life of joy measured in nano-seconds on Christmas Day.
  9. For some kids, sitting for that famed Christmas dinner is a mini-torture zone.
  10. The pressures on parents/carers to maintain calm for hours can suffocate the joy out of any lighted Christmas pudding.

There is probably not a parent/carer who celebrates Christmas with a child with special needs who does not put their head down on the pillow on Christmas night without a huge thankful thud that it is over for another year.  Who among us has not sworn we will never do it that way again….

Christmas Present

And yet, here we are, preparing for Christmas Present, ready to repeat/endure the same routine.

This year, please have a thought for families who may be struggling, those who need a change.  Those who see a train wreck coming and are asking in ways big and small for your help.

The weight of Tradition is bearing down on us, suffocating us.  We are already balancing as best as we can the demands in our own homes, let alone bringing our particular road show to others’ houses.  We desperately want to feel festive.  We want so much to have fun, to be reminded of what it is like to feel relaxed and joyful that it is Christmas.  But we too often feel alone, stressed, isolated, and perhaps depressed.  We are tired, even if we have plastered a happy smile on our face for the kids and for you.

Ten tips for helping a family with FASD through this holiday:

  1. Give them time to prepare – offer to take their kid(s) for a walk or out for hot chocolate, or for a sleepover one weekend before Christmas. They have some elving to do and really could use the time to feel the fun of it.
  2. Offer to help put up lights and decorations when the kids are out at school.
  3. Treat the parents/carers to a festive lunch one day while the kids are at school, before Christmas holiday madness happens.
  4. Plan to have a special activity with the kids during the holiday – plan ahead, let that be your present to the child. A movie, a trip to a soft play area, ice skating, a trip to a special pool – anything.  Believe me, the parents will worship you for it.
  5. Keep celebrations short – holiday marathons are not made for kids who sprint.
  6. If you are worried about ornaments breaking – remove them before kids with FASD arrive, do not let the focus of the day be everyone telling the kid to stay away from shiny, sparkly, intriguing things they are never going to be able to ignore.
  7. Ask ahead what the kids might eat – it is nowhere written that mac and cheese is banned from a Christmas table.
  8. If you know adults with FASD – reach out to them before Christmas, ask how they are doing, see if they need help planning or shopping. Ask what’s on their minds.  Some grapple with past traumas that would bring most of us to our knees.  Invite them over if they have no where to go.
  9. If someone you know struggles with addictions, don’t serve alcohol if you have invited them to your home.  Show respect.  At the very least be sure you have some fun sodas and non-alcoholic treats.
  10. Give people the space they need – have somewhere quiet ready in case a person with FASD needs to have a break, and let them go there without making them feel bad, without any jokes.  The pressures each feels are very individual, please be flexible and understanding and do not interpret their needs as a personal criticism.

Christmas Future

And then, there are all those Christmases Future.  As challenging as our past and presents may be we all have a wish for the future – to ensure other families can avoid having to face these challenges altogether.  The most important gift in the world is the gift of health.

christmas2016

There is great pressure at this time of year to be ‘festive’ – to have another cocktail.  To toast a new year coming.  People make merry in lots of ways.

Statistics show that “December is the month when the highest number of babies are conceived and the month in which the highest amount of alcohol is consumed. (Office of National Statistics, 2015).  It is crucial therefore that families are aware of guidelines about the effects of prenatal exposure to alcohol and developmental risk for children so that they can enjoy the festive period more easily.”  (See the excellent article by Carolyn Blackburn, “Did You Know More Babies Are Conceived at Christmas Than Any Other Time of Year?”)

If you think you might be pregnant, if you are trying to get pregnant, or if you are having sex without birth control, remember, remember, remember it’s not just about this year, but all those years ahead.

The UK Chief Medical Officer says “The safest approach is not to drink alcohol at all.”

Here is a video by Lee Harvey-Heath, an adult with FASD who encourages people to see the world through his eyes via his Facebook Page (which we strongly encourage you to ‘like’) and other outreach.

 

One Final Thought

And yet, for all the angst, there still is nothing better in the whole world than to see a child’s face light up in that first magical moment on Christmas morning.

 

 

Coming Up for Air?

we-love-a-child-with-fasd-6By FASD_Mum

And, breathe…

Five days.  Five days without one meltdown.  Five days without our son on the floor pleading with us to stay home. Five days without having things thrown, without anything broken.  Five days of this slight loosening of the grip on our chests.  Five days so far at his new school, and we are starting as a family to come up for air.

We know these are early days.  We expect to hit bumps on the road.  The week has not been easy for our guy, we see that on his face where he has been biting his lips which are sore and raw.  He has had so much to take in, so much to absorb.

And yet, there is a peace about him, a contentment that was not there a week ago.  He has come home each day tired but calm.  He doesn’t have much to say, this process is being internalized.  When we ask him, he says his new school is good and his lips are sore because of the cold outside.  We see he needs not to be peppered with one hundred questions.  We sit close.  We rub his feet.  And we wait for a meltdown that just doesn’t come.  We breathe in.  And we breathe out, a little more relaxed.

There are surprises. Already the education is breaking through. The first day he tells us they watched a movie, “The Tempest” by William Shakespeare.  He corrects my pronunciation of one of the German composers.  He pulls out a keyboard that hasn’t been used in ages.  He has been painting, bringing out games he has not played in ages.  He records a TV documentary about WWII and lays on the couch and watches it two afternoons in a row.  Plopping on the couch and watching TV may seem mundane to some, or even your parental nightmare, but in our house, this has never happened.  He has not previously chosen an educational program, and just watched it for an hour.  This is the sort of quiet that has descended that we are not sure if we can trust yet.  Perhaps, once it all stops being so new at school then he won’t be so tired and we may yet again see the after school ramped up behaviors.  Or perhaps not.  But for now, we have space to breathe deeper, lungs starting to expand.  We know enough to hang onto such moments.

Perhaps being around teachers who understand him, who listen as he sings, and who spot his growing distress due to the noise in the wood shop and who take him out to a quiet space matters.  Perhaps being in a place where he can pop into the sensory room at lunchtime and play with Orbeez matters.  Perhaps being allowed to wear hairclips in whatever way he wants to keep his growing hair out of his eyes matters.  Perhaps petting the school dogs and feeding the guinea pigs matters.   Perhaps not having to wear a tie or an uncomfortable blazer matters.  Perhaps not hearing loud bells ringing every hour and not having to face a huge scrum in the hallways several times a day matters.  Perhaps, and we hadn’t anticipated this, focusing on Candy Crush during the 30-minute drive in the car to get to and from this school matters as it is providing him transition time that he lacked before between home and school.

He is going to sleep on his own again, he doesn’t need me by his side to unwind at night.  He is not as oppositional, not so easily discouraged.  OK, he is learning some new vocabulary and occasionally using it.  A couple of the other kids who have less social boundaries bewilder him – he is not used to kids wandering during lessons, using curse words and not being sent out of the classroom.  But if something confuses him or throws him off, he recovers more quickly now.  Not everything is sending him into orbit.  I feel the hypervigilance we had been living under is slowly beginning to melt away.

Our relatives are rejoicing.  They tell us they have not seen us look like this in ages.  They see a glimmer in our eyes that has been missing for some time.  We are still a bit stunned.  Not yet fully relaxed.

People are asking if we wish we had done this switch sooner.  The answer to that is that we needed the past year so he could benefit from the expertise of a seasoned and experienced SENCO, deeper insights from teachers and the teaching assistants who worked so closely with him, and the pile of reports done by others they brought into in the secondary school to give us the missing in-depth specialist assessments – detailed pieces of the puzzle that we lacked previously.  These evaluations enable us to understand his educational profile better than those that we had in hand from the primary school.  They also provided the convincing body of evidence needed to enable the powers that be to make a quick decision to move him to special provision.  So his time in the mainstream school was useful to him and to us, even as it was hard.  But we are very, very happy to have found a place that seems to be better meeting his needs.

We are not sure what to expect this weekend.  I am guessing there will be a release of tension at some point.  Things may yet sail across the room.  We will do our best to get him some physical activity, to keep things positive, to keep pressures at bay.  I hope we can see him laugh.

But five days…I will hold onto that.  Who knew five consecutive days could be had without that heart-wrenching dysregulation that had become commonplace in our home?

I, for one, had not realized that we had forgotten how peaceful it can be to simply breathe without waiting for a crash or a bang or other signs of a small, pressured soul poised ready to explode.

I hope, I hope, I hope that we are breaking free of those times.  But I am sure we must be vigilant and protect these hopes from disappointment.  I am sure we are not out of the woods.  FASD is a hard, brutal taskmaster – throwing many hurdles in the way time and time again.  But five days…they mean something too, and we have to celebrate when we can the successes that come our way.

 

 

Defeat is the Enemy

my-heart-broke-for-the-thousandth-time-watching-him-rage-against-this-world-and-the-pressures-we-put-on-him-to-conform-2By @FASD_Mum

He was on the floor, screaming, his voice hoarse from crying.  He did not want to go to school. He tried to tell us this in every way he could.  It started as soon as he woke up, “Mum, my nose is still running. [It wasn’t.] I have a cold.  [He did, last week.]  I can’t go to school.”  Later on he changed his approach, said his tummy ached.  Then he switched tack and told us he doesn’t like school, it’s “boring.”  “I want to stay home with you.”  As his more peaceful entreaties failed to sway us, as we brought out the school uniform and steamrolled past his comments trying to get him dressed, his panic began to escalate and became palpable.  It stopped being words, started being actions.  Running up to his room, hiding under covers.  Going into his calm space, pulling the curtains, asking us to leave him alone.  We asked him how much time he needed, gave him a few more minutes as we have been advised – so that he had some say in how the morning should go.  But the clock was moving, and we had another child to get to school.  Work to do.  We really needed him to go to school.  He fed off our growing tension, things got worse. Five minutes later, when we went back, he was still not ready.  We ramped up even though we knew we shouldn’t.  He really didn’t want to go.  We really needed him to go.  Things started flying.  Chaos, again.  Fetal Alcohol Syndrome does not make for gentle mornings in our household these days.

Before this morning was done, he became fully dysregulated.  His brain was overwhelmed, locked in fight and flight mode.  We were beyond getting out of this calmly.  He was screaming, crying, kicking, pleading, begging, entreating me directly, “Mummy!”

My heart broke for the thousandth time watching him rage against this world and the pressures we put on him to conform, hating ourselves for trying to bend his will to a system that is not designed for someone like him.

And then, there it was.  The moment of defeat.  He had surrendered.  I could see it in his eyes.  He disappeared a little more inside himself.  He lost his battle, again.  He headed off to school reluctantly with my husband, shoulders drooped.  Shattered.

We all are shattered. This morning was like most mornings these days.

I ache inside for what he loses every time this happens.

I don’t think that his teachers understand what it costs him just to walk through the school doors, through the halls, to sit expectantly at the desk knowing they aren’t really talking to him, aren’t really expecting him to light up with the answers.  Every single time he goes into school is an act of courage.  Lately it also is increasingly an act of defeat.

We have finally understood the need for change.  We have heard him.  We do listen.  We are making moves to get him to a special needs school now – especially since it has been made clear to us that the changes in mainstream education leave no place for someone like him.  We see that he is being set up to fail.  But bureaucracies move slowly.  We are not at all certain we will be able to get him into the school we want him to attend.

We are in a no-man’s land.  We have told him we will look for a new school and that it will take time.  But he really is struggling, and he needs something to change now, today, this minute.  For someone with FASD “taking time” is a hard concept on a good day.  And these are not good days.

He has regressed – playing games, watching shows that he used to like several years ago. His little being is so tensed up with anxiety that he has no resilience, no give-and-take.  He is always 30 seconds away from exploding.  His senses are super heightened.  I ate a raspberry the other day, and he instantly asked “What’s that smell?” and pushed me away because it was unexpected.  These are days when we have to tiptoe gently since a meal can be rejected due to a wrong spoon, a slightly different type of sausage, fish fingers that are not Birds’ Eye batter-dipped, or if someone “breathed” on a spoonful of food.  These are days when tooth-brushing is like a physical attack, when the way a hair band grips can lead to a massive meltdown, when a bit of water on a paddle ball racket has people ducking for cover amid instant mayhem.

It is heart-wrenching.  And exhausting.  We are living on edge as this school situation sorts itself out.  We are not the only ones.  There are many, many people whose kids are being forced to fit into classrooms that are not bending enough for their needs, classrooms that are constricting creativity to be able to meet the demands of the new guidelines regarding GCSEs.  There are too many kids with FASD who go into schools that fail to recognize this as a disability and don’t make the necessary “reasonable adjustments” to allow that child a chance to succeed before he or she fails or acts out or crumbles under the pressure.

I dread the defeat I see more and more often in his eyes.

No, worse than that, I fear it.  That defeat is the enemy.

I want him always to rail against this world, to stand up for himself and his beliefs, to think that when he tells people what he needs in a moment they will listen to him.  I hate, hate, hate that despite the fact he has told us in a million ways that school is overwhelming to him, that he is not happy there, that he cannot access what is being taught in the way it is being taught, we still must force him out that door.  It makes me question my parenting.  It makes me feel selfish.  It makes me feel like I am not doing my Momma Bear job of protecting my cub in a mean and sharp-edged world.

So, we bend in other places.  I find another spoon, quietly put aside the fish fingers that are not batter-dipped, dig through the refrigerator for something else he might or might not eat.  Lately, nearly every day  after school he is so beside himself with pent-up anxiety he has a meltdown-that-comes-down-on-us-all-like-a-ton-of-bricks, even though we have come to expect it.  Afterwards, I sit with him for hours in the dark.  I just sit there next to him, hoping my presence calms him, proves to him that I am on his side. Together, we wait for that moment that always comes at the end of these long days, with a little sigh somewhere just before sleep, “Mummy, I love you.”  “I love you too pal.  I love you too.”  Sleep tight.  Sweet dreams.  You’re a good kid.

We know that secondary disabilities are a huge threat to the well-being of people with FASD – too many tender lives are shortened needlessly as a result of addictions, dangerous behaviours, suicides – by-products of the toxic frustration that builds in kids with limited coping mechanisms who feel misunderstood, outcast and who seek temporary fixes to feel better.  We hear that policy makers in London are concerned about our kids’ mental health.  The young royals try to raise these issues through charity work.  And yet, no one focuses on the significant proportion of the population with brain injury due to FASD, whose mental health is at stake and worsening as a result of inaction and lack of support from The System.

The government’s sweeping changes to education policy is making it worse, not better, directly impacting the daily lives of kids like our son.  Scenes like the one I have described are happening in front halls and/or in schools across the country as the children signal that they are unable to cope in an environment that is too rigid.

What exactly, I would like to know, are we expected to say to our kids, you know, the ones who try their hardest but who just aren’t going to get those grades? The ones that are in the grey area – getting by, barely, but at such a great cost to their self-esteem – the ones none of you really think are going to cut it in the new system…?  The ones who know it too, who rail against going out the door to school for very legitimate reasons.  The ones who have no choice when the entire adult world comes down hard on them to just go to school, no matter what?  The ones who get detentions for not doing homework they didn’t understand, who crack jokes rather than show that the teacher’s instructions passed them by?  The kids who are bullied or the ones who lash out?  The ones who didn’t have support and, yes, failed that test again?  What do we say to stop that mind-numbing defeat from taking over their whole being?

We tell them we love them.  We seek every possible way forward, banging on every door that we know.  We reach out to other parents. We seek experts who can advise us.  We ignore those who say we have to live with things the way they are.  We don’t give up, and we don’t let that defeat seep into our kids’ inner core.  We hold onto them.  We cherish them.  We tell them at the end of each and every long day, we love them.  We are there for them.  Together we will find a better way.  And somehow, deep inside, we have to believe it. It’s hard.  Oh, yes.  It’s hard.  But we have to keep that spark alive.

Wrestling with “Death” is Tough for a Kid with FASD…and His Parents

we-love-a-child-with-fasd-5By FASD_Mum

I spent yesterday willing our dog to live, convinced it was succumbing to the heart problems that are common to his breed.  I dearly love the dog, don’t get me wrong, but first and foremost in my mind was how inconceivably impossible it would be to explain to our 12-year old with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome if something were to happen to his Christmas dog.

This dog has been perfect for our family from day one.  Our son wanted a dog desperately.  He wrote to Father Christmas specifically for one that wouldn’t “bark, whine, or whinge.”  Father Christmas had sent him a letter explaining that dogs are special gifts, and involved special procedures.  Like a scene out of “Miracle on 34th Street,” this Christmas magic seemed predestined – there we were meeting Noel (amazingly, that was his name), a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel that had been rescued from doggie-death-row in Ireland.  Miracle of miracles, this dog was silent (just like our son had been when we adopted him).  He was calm, unflappable, and oh so friendly.  He was instantly one of us.

They bonded very quickly but we realized early on that our guy was not going be able to be the main carer for the dog.  We had to make adjustments to expectations as our house has grown more chaotic over recent years with some escalating behaviours.  We no longer leave Noel sleeping in our son’s bedroom because despite how sweet it was to see the two of them sleeping side by side, the mornings were unfair to Noel, when our son would be too hyper before his medication kicked in and the dog would get too wound up.   Sometimes we have concerns that such a small dog might get hurt during a meltdown, so we are always aware of where the dog is, and often shift him to different rooms if things are heating up.  Sometimes the dog also ramps up the moment, as he has certainly learned by now how to bark, and his eagerness for walks makes our front door hallway a scene of mayhem sometimes. (This, because our morning routines are not routine any longer.  We cannot know on a given day if our son will go to school on time, if we can get him to walk or if he needs to be driven, etc.  So the dog never knows if he will get an early walk on a given day and puts in his vote strongly at just the time when we do not need more noise.)   Despite his confusion, the dog is still uncannily good-natured, and remains a favourite at the school gates.  Our son proudly shows him off, telling his friends for the umpteenth time that this is his dog, and his name is Noel.  Noel went missing once – that night was one of the longest around here in a very long time. Though we found out later he had tucked up safely in a shelter all the while, that fear of losing him was etched into our son’s being.

As our son gets older, his anxieties are deepening, or at least he is able to vocalize them now.  He lives in fear of Noel disappearing again.  Every walk, every time the door opens, our guy panics, lunges for Noel’s collar – sometimes tackling him with a full body hug.  We had been to a field in the two days prior to this mystery illness.  Our son has been extremely unsettled lately-partly due to a cold but more so due to increasing challenges at school.  He was panicking as the dog would sniff along the tree line, worried he might disappear into the overgrowth.  Of course, needless to say, as I was dealing with one of my son’s outbursts, the dog did in fact wander into the woods.  Sheer distress overwhelmed our guy.  The dog happily came when we called, tail-a-wagging, but my son was devastated by the experience.  The next day he was almost crying when I let the dog off the lead, begging me not to let him wander away.

So, no, I could not contemplate a world in which this dog would leave us so soon.

Uncharacteristically, the dog didn’t budge from one spot on the couch for more than seven hours.  He was barely able to open his eyes when I called his name, giving a half a wag of that tail that usually never stops.  I could see the worry in our older son’s eyes.  I probably should have called the vet sooner, but I was becoming convinced this was heart failure, though I didn’t voice that, and I doubted there was anything they could do – nothing that we could afford anyway. My dad had heart problems.  Our minds do strange things sometimes.

I admit it, I was worried.  Very worried.  And yes, I literally curled up around him for more than an hour – maybe closer to two – hoping my presence next to him might give him strength, pretending to be part of the pack.  It may sound silly, I am not necessarily one of those people who invokes Mother Earth, but I was running on instinct, and I believe in the power of love.  It was all I could think to do.

As it turns out, antibiotics have more power in this case, as an evening visit to the vet demonstrated.  But that was only after a very long day.  My son had a meltdown after school – his reaction, I think to the dog being unwell.  A good friend had come by to help calm the scene (my husband is traveling, I am flying solo, we all have colds, it has been a hell of a week – and when I say that, I mean it).  My sister-in-law (the other Auntie you don’t hear so much about but who is equally supportive) had come by to give a second opinion on the dog.  She was the nudge I needed – she literally dialed the vet and handed me the phone.  She drove us over, and was another set of ears while my overwhelmed brain was catching only half the words.  It’s not the dog’s heart, which is a huge relief.  There is some sort of lump in his throat, but not something stuck in his throat.  It’s unlikely it’s the c-word, though we won’t know for certain for a while.  He had a raised temperature, so we are thinking it is some sort of infection.  The vet dosed him up with painkillers and antibiotics, and I have literally been slowly spoon-feeding this dog while whispering gentle encouragement.  Not yet, sweet dog, not yet.  We need you.  Our son needs you.  Not this week.  Not while our guy is struggling so hard.  Not now, please, please get better.  Willing this dog to eat.  Willing him to recover.

For some reason our son’s English class is studying the Titanic.  For a kid who has a morbid and not particularly healthy fascination of floods, storms, disasters – this story has captured his imagination in a way few subjects at school do.  He is watching and re-watching clips on YouTube, he plays the song over and over again – having learned about its composition.  He asks Siri how old Leonardo DiCaprio was in a given year.  And he ponders mortality.  In the darkened bedroom the other night, when I thought he was asleep, I heard, “I would so totally die if I was on the Titanic.  How old are you when you die?  I miss Grad [his grandfather who died several years ago].  How old was Grad when he died?  What year was he born?  What year was Bebe [his vivacious grandmother] born?  What year were you born?  What year was Daddy born?  What year was I born?  What about my brother?  Why do we die?”  Trying to overcome his inability to wrap his head around time and math, he was struggling with some of those existential questions we all wonder about, but in his own unique way due to his FASD.  His fears were magnified by the fact he could not quite grasp these concepts.  He was in a loop, going over and over and over in his mind, trying to understand when and why we all will die.

When my sister-in-law and I headed off to the vet with the dog, our friend took our son to her house for a sleep over.  We are so lucky to have such a support system, this impromptu change of bedtime plans on a school night could easily have sent our guy into orbit, but he was great (though I predict I will pay for this today after school).  Our friend and her young daughter who is one of our son’s few true friends are lifelines.

So, thankfully, our guy did not see the dog’s massive drooling, his inability to eat food.  Our son did not hear about the lump.  He didn’t see the food scattered all over the floor because our dog cannot eat properly yet.  Hopefully by the time he comes home from school, the dog will have recovered to such a point that we won’t trigger the very worst of the fears.  And thankfully the dog does seem better today, he has more of his sparkle back.  He has eaten more, though he has not left my side.

Our son is a stress sponge.  Even if he cannot name it, or even fully understand it, it was not a coincidence that all of those things from his bedroom were thrown down the stairs yesterday.  It was not unrelated.  Sometimes my head cannot handle it all, especially when I am feeling under the weather myself.  My cold has deepened, and yes the drool had me gagging over the toilet, such a glamorous life sometimes!  How do we – do I – juggle all of this:  sick kids, sick dog, a house that is a disorganized mess and getting worse (knowing how badly this affects our son), stresses over work, stresses over the level of stress, trying to switch our son to a special needs school, so much paperwork, so much to remember, new appointment letters coming through the door at rapid rates, phone calls we have not yet returned, requests for media interviews as we become more vocal about all of this, so much of life’s minutia that we seem to miss as we deal with Big Issues Every Single Day…???

The pressures are immense when trying to help our son navigate this world.  Some things we can smooth over for him.  Some things we can adjust and adapt to the way his brain works.  Some things we can redirect or hide away.  But there are other things we simply cannot change no matter how much we would like to ‘fix’ them.

For me, I am a better person for learning these hard lessons.  I know that.  I own it.  My ego has taken more than a few hits in the years of parenting this child (both kids, really, but this blog is about FASD).  I am humbled time and time again to learn that while there are many things I can do to help, I cannot alter the fact that our son will experience this world in a much harsher and harder way that I would ever have wished for him.   The adults with FASD from whom we learn so much always say that he will have to live his life.  A hard thought, but they urge us to remember that these early years and the values we live and teach will always be inside him helping him to find his way.  I know that.  I do.  I know that.

But, damn.  As I laid there on that couch yesterday, wrapped around this tiny, sick, furry, fluff ball pretending to be mamma wolf or something, I wasn’t ready yet to have to tell our guy, during one of his worst months ever, that I couldn’t fix his Christmas dog.  Not yet.  Fingers crossed, not yet.


P.S. – Here is a clip of our son and his Christmas dog from a year ago…to show just how strong the bond is between them….I  know it will make you smile.  

Anxiety & FASD

we-love-a-child-with-fasd-2

By @FASD_Dad

Anxiety. We all get anxious about things. We’re late for an appointment. Can we afford to get a repair on the car done?  Does that girl I like like me too?  (Turns out she does and in a long and roundabout way that led to this blog.)

That anxiety is real, but compared to the anxiety our son feels, every day, all the time, about everything, our anxiety is trivial.

Our son is a boiling kettle of anxiety, says the counsellor who is helping us learn how to better care for him. That’s his normal state. That’s why, when something goes wrong or doesn’t go as he expects, he blows into a full scale meltdown almost immediately. A meltdown where things get thrown. Where kicks and punches are thrown. Where his little frame is rigid with tension because he simply cannot bear the pressure in his brain. Where his senses no longer work to help him interpret the world around him, but are screaming at him to fight! Fight! FIGHT!

So what causes this terrible anxiety? Well, in common with many kids with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, pretty much anything. Our son has such a hard time understanding the world around him, his social relationships, the tasks he has to manage at school, that everything causes him to worry.

In the last few days it has manifested itself in different ways.

Does the dinner he loved yesterday taste very slightly different today? Or is it a little too hot? Or a little too cold? That’s a massive sensory problem which can mean dinner is thrown across the room. Or it could just mean a refusal to eat a meal and a retreat into his safe space to watch videos.

Are we going to a new gymnastics club? Somewhere unknown? That’s a huge source of anxiety which means it is really, really hard to get out of the door. We have to find exactly the right bandana to make it ok. Is the new gymnastics club different? Do they do the exercises slightly differently to the previous club? That means they’re doing it wrong, so he can’t join in, he has to sit and watch. And, because the hall is smaller and the noise too intense, the sensory input becomes too much and his anxiety levels start to go through the roof. So we have to leave. And now we need to find another gymnastics club because his original one was all girls and him, and that’s worked for several years but now he wants to be with boys, doing boys gymnastics.

Are we off for a walk with the dog? Well, the dog mustn’t be let off the lead because if he’s off the lead he might run away.  If he is out of sight for a second he might have run away, and the panic in our son’s voice is palpable. The dog, you see, ran away once. He got far enough away that he was taken to the pound, and we didn’t get him back for 24 hours. And so, for our son, the anxiety of losing his beloved pet is ever present. Something else to add to the list of things that add to his anxiety.

There’s swimming at school. But the message didn’t get to us, so he has to do hockey instead of swimming. That’s not right because the timetable says swimming.  Right there, that’s enough to spin him out of control and into meltdown. But at school, barely, he holds himself together, and then at home as he lets the pressure valve go.  With us he knows it is safe to let go, the meltdown starts and goes on and on. And a week later, the worry about whether we know it’s swimming and does he have his swimming kit in the bag comes bursting out as we try to get him out the door to school. Yes, we know, it’s here. Is it here? Yes, the kit is here. I have swimming today, do I have swimming?

The pressure his anxiety puts on him is horrible.

So what’s the effect of this? Of living on the edge all day every day? Of worrying about everything around you in such an intense way.

We’re constantly worried about him and his mental health. We are constantly concerned that our son will crack under this pressure, lose what ability he has to cope with life.

What is the long term effect of living with this level of anxiety on the rest of the family? For our family it puts us all on edge. Our elder non-FASD son is a calm boy, but when his mum and I argue, as we sometimes do under the pressure of dealing with yet another meltdown, he cracks and shouts at us to be calm. His worries are just below the surface too.

For us, it means living with uncertainty all the time. Wondering when the happy, smiling little boy in front of us will suddenly flip into a raging little bundle of doubts and fears, unable to process his anxieties and lashing out at those around him.

So we’re trying to give him tools to regulate himself. A mood chart, from a calm, blue sea to a raging storm so he can learn to express how he feels, something he really cannot do very well at the moment. We try to use it with him when he’s happy as well as when his mood is deteriorating, helping him to learn a vocabulary to tell us about himself.

We’re trying to be better about regulating the environment around him. Making sure each day that he knows what will be happening, what we’re doing, what he will do. No surprises is the rule. Over the summer we had stopped using the family white board to write was coming up – and he just asked us to start that again. A small sign of growing self-awareness – he needs to know the routine of the day.

When his mood cracks and the signs of meltdown are obvious we’re improvising on tools the therapists gave us. We use sensory stimulus to distract him from meltdown. Pretending with a variety of pressures that he is in a sandwich, he is cheese that melts; or a piece of hard pasta that gets wiggly when it’s cooked; an ice cube that melts, or an egg that cracks. At the moment this technique has a sometimes remarkable effect. Twice in one day it altered a mood that was darkening, and forestalled the descent into full sensory dysregulation.  We have learned some tips to try to head off the meltdowns.

We have to help stop the kettle boiling over, and find a way to take the pressure off so it isn’t ready to blow at any second. It’s tough. But for his sake, we need to find a way.