Blog_BegBy SB

There have been times in this FASD journey where I have literally been reduced to begging for the help that our son deserves and needs. Yesterday was another such day. Some boxes had been ticked somewhere in The System. I had been feeling really good for the first time in ages at the support that is in place around our child. It’s been working. It makes sense. The people involved are getting to know each other. There is a common language developing across the teams.

So, of course, without warning, yet another service had decided that because our son was doing well enough (despite having been referred here not long ago due to a series of crises) and because he had had x number of sessions, it was time to boot him out of their system.

Hold on. Wait? What?

Oh no you don’t.

Not yet.

Mamma Bear woke up and with the nicest smile she could manage laid out 10,000 reasons why this was not a good idea. We’d be happy to put all this in writing, of course, not as a complaint, but as a compliment, she said, because your service has made such an important contribution to our son’s wellbeing and because we know statistically he’s just entering the hardest years for those with FASD. You matter. This matters. Too few people out there ‘get’ FASD. We shouldn’t have to waste key NHS resources to help others who might not be familiar with our family and our son’s needs get up to speed on these things. Too often for people with FASD, it takes years for the supports to be finally put in place. Then, when they start working, they are removed. We don’t want that to happen to our son at such a critical time in his life – he’s just turning 14. We could share the stats with you if you like of the addictions, the problems with the law, the homelessness, the vulnerability he is facing as teen with FASD preparing to enter adulthood.

Please, please don’t discharge him from your service. Look – it’s been working.  We just shared with you several examples of how what you have taught him has worked. But let’s be honest, this is work you would normally do with a much younger child. What would normally come next? There are a whole host of other skills he will need to learn and master, other conversations he will need to practice. You can’t honestly believe that we are out of the woods and no other crises are likely to come up?  This service has the ability to see him until he is 19, why discharge him now?  Let’s spread out the sessions…just keep him on the books in case something else heats up. C’mon, let’s think this through.

Please, he needs you.  We need you. Not because what we are learning with you is rocket science, but because he’s now used to you, to this. It’s working. Do you need me to lie and say it’s not? He has a language he uses here. Why should he have to spend a year or more waiting for a different referral, building trust and a way of interacting with another therapist? It makes no sense. Sorry, we know you are not the one who makes the rules, but please don’t discharge him until we can speak with whomever it is who does.

I know I am begging. I am shameless about this. We are literally fighting for our child’s life. I don’t say that lightly, I mean it. We have a few years here to get this right – to give him the tools and the words he will need as he turns toward adulthood. I can tell you stories of people with FASD who we know who didn’t have support and who had to overcome things we don’t want any young person to have to cope with. This support and help matters. How is it possible that a young person with a brain-based disability who is vulnerable in many ways, who has receptive language problems, who is grappling with some of the major issues of puberty magnified by an intellectual disability that makes these years even more of a minefield could NOT qualify for your help?

Absolutely we can help identify specific goals! Absolutely we can work with you on a targeted plan. Absolutely we agree it would be good to get all the professionals around one table to make sure his transition into adulthood is getting in place now while there is time to get it right.

…and so it went…

Another reprieve. Sixteen more weeks. We calculate in our head. This will get him at least into Key Stage 4. This gets us well into the new school year. We will see what happens as these coming months unfold.

For too many, today might have been the end of the sessions. For too many, they don’t even make it this far.

Why is this such a battle all the time? This, in a country that says it is trying to tackle child mental health in a serious way while simultaneously making it so hard to access services?

How is it not a better use of resources to give people skills to be able to help them cope with a lifelong disability rather than waiting until a crisis hits, at great cost to the child/young person and the family? How is it not worthwhile to do more training for all professionals in this condition that experts believe affects more than autism?

How can we possibly leave people with FASD and their families struggling on their own when there are known strategies that can help?

Caring societies are meant to care. They are meant to open doors, make the way easier for those who need an extra hand. They are supposed to enrich the lives of those vulnerable individuals who deserve support, encouragement and understanding.

Not slam doors in the faces of those parents seeking help for a struggling child. Not tell someone whose child has a brain-based disability that it’s their parenting and not compromised brain wiring that is causing the problems. Not kick students out of schools because the educators haven’t educated themselves on the executive functioning and cognitive issues that occur with FASD. These last two haven’t happened to us but they certainly do happen all too often, in too many places.

Yes, today we had a small victory in clinging onto a service that does give us strategies. But we really shouldn’t have to beg.

Seriously, society … we shouldn’t have to beg.