Food in an FASD Family

Blog_Food

Also available in audio format:

By SB_FASD

Once upon a time, I imagined growing up and having a happy, bouncing home full of people who would love to sit around a table and share elbow-to-elbow in overflowing platters full of fragrant, mouth-wateringly good and abundant food.  In my mind’s eye, we’d help each other prepare the food, dip our spoons in and ‘taste test’ whatever was bubbling away on the stove, laughing, teasing, and reveling in food of all sorts, just as I did in some of the most wonderful memories of my youth.  We’d tease and cajole each other, dig in for seconds, and all help tidy up after the meal was over.  That was my dream.

HaHaHaHaHaHaHa.

As if.

Needless to say, that is NOT the life we lead today in the home I cherish despite its complete difference from the world I knew as a child.

It took years and years for me to ‘let it go.’  Years and years of slowly beginning to understand just how deep FASD reaches into my son’s very being, giving him a different window on this world.  Years and years of hanging onto that belief that one day we would somehow slide into my (previous picture of) ‘normality.’

Prenatal exposure to alcohol can damage the way a person’s brain develops. When it occurs, those intricate and as yet-to-be-fully understood neural connections are compromised, scrambled, damaged. Signals don’t go where they should go. No one really know exactly how or why, but they do know a person with FASD can have some very serious sensory issues, the damage can affect development of other organs and systems – throwing the whole body into imbalance. One part of this complex picture is that it can leave a person with FASD with a very complicated relationship with food. These issues can be compounded if there also was early trauma.

Feeding our youngest was never going to be easy – he was deprived of food early on. He had rickets when we adopted him. He had to learn at 16 months how to eat until he was full, not until his body literally threw it up (as infants learn much, much earlier). Despite his troubles, he is not even so very severely affected – we know of other children with feeding tubes, adults who have been hospitalized because of imbalances in their systems. Despite a slow start, our son is growing, doing okay-ish on the growth charts. Yet, these challenges, minor as they are in the FASD scheme of things, altered the way our entire family interacts with food, changing the way we celebrate holidays and altering daily routines to the point where our house no longer resembles the life I thought I would lead. I am not ‘blaming’ anyone here, just describing a new reality that we have accepted.

I know there are those out there who will be reading this and object to the idea that a family’s routines can be so altered. I know there are families who have managed nevertheless to convene all around a table multiple times each day.  I know it’s possible and I take my hat off to anyone who manages that. But it is not life in our household. Not now anyway.  When our guy was younger we kind of plowed on with it. We could force the issue a bit more. But as he has become more independent and more vocal about exactly what he can and cannot stomach, we have chosen not to have conflict around food in our house.  Well, we try not to have conflict around food.  But, of course, we do.

I wish we had started from the premise that there is ‘always a reason’ for certain behaviours. It might have saved us years of wrangling over food issues. I have said it before – our son has always shown us what he needs, we have just been too slow to pick up on what he is communicating to us. Even now when he is increasingly speaking his truth, we still sometimes don’t really ‘hear’ what he’s saying.

“My body can’t handle it.” As it turns out, this is true, though it took years to diagnose his cows’ milk protein allergy and more years to understand how this might affect so many of his digestive issues. Anything to do with burping, reflux, toileting, soiling, sore tummies or gas all cause great distress for someone with sensory issues. Imagine being a toddler and being unable to explain this. It’s hard enough for a 13-year old. We still don’t know if we know the whole picture, but we do know this one allergy can affect him profoundly.

“It smells.” We have come to realise that our son’s sense of smell is highly developed. Much of taste has to do with smell, so if something doesn’t smell right or good to him, there is no way it’s going down. What smells ‘good’ to him might be completely different than we might think through our more traditional programming. We have made this into a positive – we praise his sense of smell.

“It’s disgusting.” An adult with FASD in an online support group once vividly described his visceral reaction to certain foods or textures. This is graphic. He said when he is being forced to eat something that his body is rejecting it is like being forced to chew and swallow poo. He said there is no rhyme or reason to it. He can’t explain why. It just is. This is important to hear from an adult perspective because we tend to force our children even when they say such things. We have learned that there is no arguing when our son is rejecting food due to a sensory issue.  It also took us a while to understand that he actually enjoys strong flavours – vinegar and mustard and pickled onions and other tastes a child normally avoids, while something like milk chocolate somehow disturbs him. His brain is wired differently.

“Your germs are on it now.” Our son is learning rules for handling food at school. To him use-by dates are gospel. A flame a bit too high on the stove spells danger. Everything to do with cooking and serving food has its ability to send his anxieties through the roof – from the sound and feel of knives and forks on ceramic plates to whether or not someone ‘breathed’ on his food can signal the end of a meal, even before he gets to the point of tasting it.  Lately he has his own tiny (cocktail) forks and spoons, his own plastic and melamine plates and bowls, his own plastic cups. If one of us uses something of his, he won’t use it again. If we touch his food, he won’t eat it. Sometimes.

“I’m not hungry.” He cannot read his body’s signals. We know this from occupational therapists’ assessments. He doesn’t feel sensations in the same way most of us do. On top of that, he has medication for ADHD that actually suppresses his appetite. If he’s not hungry, there is nothing we can do or say to change that. We have found feeding him unusual breakfasts (burgers or salmon) and planning later substantial ‘snacks’ (fish fingers) at bedtime can help ensure he gets the nutrients he needs. This is especially important as we have been unable to get him to take a multivitamin for a while now. We are picking our battles with pills.

His body and mind fixates on things – this is also directly related to how his brain works and maybe even his nutritional needs. He craves foods. He can go days on end where all he wants are avocados or pepperami or salmon or…. If he knows something is in the house that he is craving, it is impossible to divert his attention from it. But these things shift from day to day, making it very frustrating when we stock up on something that is ‘in’ one day only to have it rejected again for months. The situation is not bad enough to lock up cupboards (though we understand that some need to). We just accept that whatever is in the house he may eat. If we have candy, then we only have as much as we are willing for him to eat in one day.

He is a hands on guy. We love it when we cook together. For years “I Can Cook” videos and recipe books played a huge role in our lives. We used to play a ‘Disgusting Menu’ game we made up where we would choose three things that would make the most disgusting food we could think of and then all yell together “Ew! DISGUSTING!!!” We have games about food shopping and food preparation.  He loves looking through cookbooks – we have some from around the world. His specialist school has a goal to teach all their students about 10 meals they can cook by the time they leave school, and he is becoming more confident about fixing food for himself. I have a plan in my head to start introducing him to recipe and food list apps as a way to help prepare him for adulthood.

He is learning about his body – we have Usborne lift the flap books that show the progress of food through the body, we have watched over the years the “Magic Schoolbus” episodes that help kids understand their anatomy. He has studied books about the food pyramid and knows he should ‘eat 5’ every day. He has memorised “Oliver” and he has a bowl that says “Please sir, I want some more” on it, a chopping board with the music script from “Food Glorious Food.” But none of that helps at that point where he simply cannot put that particular food into his mouth at that particular moment on that particular day.

So, we have changed our expectations about socialising over food.  Our best successes are always when we have a range of foods that he is free to choose from – a ‘smorgasbord’ where we always have at least one or two things we know he will eat and then we don’t comment if he avoids other foods. When we are in restaurants (sensory hell for him with all their confusion, noise, smells, anxieties) he is allowed to be on a phone or tablet. We limit holiday sit-down meals and we give him a place he can go to when he wants to leave the table. We have spent our fair share of time eating pub roasts outside so he can swing on play equipment while we eat quickly. If family and friends come over, we often do pizza or BBQs rather than the type of meals I would like to prepare, but which take my full attention – attention I am unlikely to be able to give to the stove when visitors can peak anxieties in many other ways. We let him eat quietly in his room for most meals – it seems to let him relax into it more when he doesn’t have the other anxieties of (for example) trying to figure out how long he needs to endure sitting at the table while others scratch their forks on their plates.

These issues are real. Research supports this. As one small study said, “children with PAE [prenatal alcohol exposure] may be at risk for nutritional deficiencies, which are influenced by inappropriate food preferences, disordered eating patterns, medication use, and the stressful dynamics surrounding food preparation and mealtime.” (Interestingly, I googled and found this quote AFTER I had written this blog post! There are many other studies as well.)

For someone with FASD food can become a trigger point in so many ways. It’s not fair to let this be a battle ground when the person with FASD is clearly struggling. ‘Dig deeper into the why-s of it’ and ‘let it go’ are the two main bits of advice which have helped us re-develop our family’s relationship with food. And yes, we allow ourselves still to giggle over ‘disgusting menus.’

Keeping the laughter and joy about food means a lot to me. Readjusting our relationship with food as a family affected by FASD does demand a lot more patience and creativity than I sometimes feel able to bring to the table, though we will never give up trying.

6 thoughts on “Food in an FASD Family

  1. This so reflects my challenges with my son and food, and explains why we do things like have lasagna for Christmas dinner instead of the traditional turkey dinner I grew up with. I can totally relate!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh yes, this is my world. The only “food”my son is guaranteed to eat is fish oil tablets! He would eat a bottle full if I let him. He has never eaten meat apart from ham, and lives on fruit, cheese , white bread, chops and biscuits. Like you I no longer let it be an issue. I have realised I literally can not force him to eat. We are however going to see an OT team that specialise in eating disorders in children this year. I am hoping they will have a strategy that I haven’t tried yet to get some healthier foot down the hatch !

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Carolyn – here’s hoping the OT team can give some suggestions for how to move forward, but you definitely have a win with those fish oil tablets! Deeply impressed.
      All good wishes.

      Like

  3. Love love love this blog post! Our son with FASD is 13, struggles with textures, hot & cold are not perceived properly, he also does not understand when he needs to eat or stop eating (likely due to neglect prior to him coming to us and part of what we call the FASD domino effect), and he refuses all medications and vitamins. It can be quite a struggle, but like you we try to avoid them and celebrate the victories. Thank you for this great post!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. “The FASD domino effect” – what a great phrase – thanks for reaching out and all good wishes, it is challenging sometimes to find the way forward, but as a Norwegian saying goes “the road is made by walking it”

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.